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Move Over Coconut Water, Here Comes Birch Water, A New Miracle Elixir

December 29, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
The newest fad in health drinks -- replacing ubiquitous coconut water -- is birch water, made from the thin, watery sap of birch trees. The drink has only 18 calories per 100 ml (3.4 ounces), and is rich in vitamin C, potassium, zinc, and copper, as well as other anti-aging nutrients. Harvested in the northern regions of Europe and China, birch water purportedly treats a range of maladies, from high cholesterol to flu, kidney stones, headaches, eczema, cellulite and dandruff. Already sold in health food stores, cafes and gyms in the U.S., the beverage should be more widely available in the U.K. this year.
Mandy Francis, "The health drink fad we'll all be trying next year - birch tree sap ", Daily Mail Online, December 29, 2014, © Associated Newspapers Ltd
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It’s Official: Vogue Says Which Foods Are Hot, Which Are Not

December 28, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
The editors at Vogue magazine have made some decisions – perhaps slightly tongue-in-cheek – about which food fads are passé and which are hot. Readers who have been delaying purchases of cronuts and avocado toast can now breathe easy. Good thing they waited, because it has been decided that both foods are officially out in 2015, replaced by shaved ice (?) and eggs. Likewise: goodbye to kombucha, kale, ramen, tacos, pork belly, coconut water, sriracha, and quinoa; hello to matcha, rainbow Swiss chard, bone broth, fried chicken, crawfish, seltzer, mustard, and grits.
Samantha Adler, "Goodbye Cronuts, Hello Shaved Ice! Bidding Farewell to the Foods of 2014 and Welcoming the Foods of 2015", Vogue, December 28, 2014, © Condé Nast
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Gaps In Botanical Safety, Quality Data Need To Be Narrowed

December 23, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A European conference concluded that more data on safety risks and ingredient quality of botanical supplements needs to be generated. In addition, governments need to make it easier to share botanical safety data. Dietary supplements derived from plants, algae, fungi or lichens are widely available globally, and an increasing number of people are collecting wild botanicals to use as food. But some botanicals and botanical preparations pose a threat to human health. Speakers at the conference said progress in this area is being made, but gaps in safety and quality data still exist.
"More Understanding, Harmonisation Needed in Use of Botanicals in Food", Asia Food Journal, December 23, 2014, © Contineo Media Pte Ltd.
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Will Sprouted Grain Be The Quinoa Of 2015?

December 23, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Sprouted grain baked goods are about to make a giant leap forward in 2015, and may rival the splash made by quinoa, according to a somewhat self-serving forecast by a Milwaukee-based bakery that produces a range of sprouted grain breads, buns, rolls, pizza crusts and wraps. Angelic Bakehouse pointed to several developments that bolster its prediction. King Arthur Flour, Panera Restaurants, and Sam’s Club, for example, will all be offering sprouted grain breads and rolls. Kellogg’s will soon be offering a sprouted grain cereal. Angelic Bakehouse CEO Jenny Marino says, “Like quinoa last year, sprouted grain is about to become a very familiar term with health-conscious consumers."
"The New Quinoa? Sprouted Grain About to Go Mainstream", News release, Angelic Bakehouse, December 23, 2014, © Angelic Bakehouse
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“Biohacking” May Be The Answer For America’s Picky Eaters

December 22, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Those Americans who have become ideologically picky eaters – i.e., they adhere to a specific dietary preference as a way of life for one reason or another – are now categorized into “tribes” by nutrition experts. Although the numbers are relatively small – five million vegetarians, 2.5 million vegans, three million paleo dieters, three million gluten-free – the tribes are significant enough to worry dietitians concerned about vitamin and other nutrient deficiencies. One emerging trend, however, tries to take the guesswork out of these tribal leanings by determining, using personalized nutrition or “biohacking” technologies, what an individual really needs to eat to stay healthy. The technologies use blood tests, stool sample tests, even genetic tests to find out precisely what is happening in the body. The service providers then advise on how eating habits can be adjusted to fix any problems.
Lisa Marshall, "Choose your tribe: 4 hot diet trends", Delicious Living, December 22, 2014, © Penton
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High Sugar, Cocoa, Butter Costs May Force Confectioners, Bakers To Hike Prices

December 20, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
High costs of ingredients are pummeling bakeries and confectioners and may force price increases for the first time in years. Sugar, cocoa, and butter are all more expensive these days. Throw in a higher minimum wage and you have a recipe for higher candy and baked goods prices. U.S. sugar prices have risen to 24.6 cents a pound in the last 18 months, even though a glut of sugar globally drove prices this past summer to their lowest level since 2009. A Montana confectioner said his company hasn’t raised prices in two years, “but we're getting to the point where we're going to have to do it again”.
Christopher Doering, "High sugar prices leave bitter taste for some", USA Today, December 20, 2014, © USATODAY, a division of Gannett Satellite Information Network, Inc.
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New York-Based Online Grocery Company Has The Formula For Success

December 19, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A 12-year-old Long Island City online grocery business, one of the five largest in the country, may epitomize the future of the $700 billion grocery industry. Nationwide, online business still accounts for less than four percent of grocery sales. But industry experts say it is the “the next frontier”, a fact well understood by Amazon and Walmart. From the beginning, online grocer FreshDirect operated under a unique vision, despite skepticism. It is not a delivery service for an established supermarket chain. Rather, the founders built the company independently, sourcing products directly from farms, and always emphasizing quality. So far, FreshDirect is available in five East Coast states, and would love to expand. But not, its owners say, at the expense of quality.
"Online supermarket FreshDirect changing way Americans grocery shop", CBS News, December 19, 2014, © CBS Interactive Inc.
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Unilever Drops Labeling Suit Against Maker Of Egg-Free Mayonnaise

December 19, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Unilever, which makes the Hellman’s brand of mayonnaise, has dropped a month-old lawsuit against a three-year old company that markets “Just Mayo”, a mayonnaise-like product that contains no eggs. Unilever alleged that Hampton Creek’s product violates U.S. food labeling rules that require mayonnaise products to contain eggs. Hampton Creek’s product contains plant-based ingredients that substitute for eggs and other proteins. Unilever said it is dropping the suit so Hampton Creek “can address its label directly with industry groups and appropriate regulatory authorities”. Hampton Creek just received $90 million in venture capital funding from Silicon Valley and Asian investors.
Tim Bradshaw, "Unilever ends egg-free mayonnaise lawsuit", The Financial Times, December 19, 2014, © The Financial Times Limited
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Taiwan’s Love Of Fruit Juices Lures Jamba

December 17, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
California-based Jamba Inc., which makes smoothies and other health drinks, will open its first outlet in semi-tropical Taiwan, where consumers have been obsessed with fresh-squeezed juices for years. The drinks – watermelon juice, avocado, vegetable cocktails -- are sold at mom-and-pop kiosks on busy city streets. Jamba is trying to figure out how to formulate its smoothies in a way that will appeal to Taiwanese tastes, which are used to tropical flavors like papaya. Thriving Taiwanese juice vendors say they aren’t too worried about a Jamba incursion. The company will probably stick to shopping malls rather than city streets, they say.
Michael Gold, "Smoothie maker Jamba counts on Taiwan's thirst for fruit juice", Reuters, December 17, 2014, © Thomson Reuters
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Wellness-Conscious Baby Boomers, Millennials Drive Functional Food Trend

December 17, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Market researcher Packaged Facts says Baby Boomers, who control 70 percent of disposable income in the U.S. are driving the wellness and functional food trends. Also providing the growth impetus for functional foods are Millennials and health/exercise advocates. Functional food marketers need to know that Millennials are looking for food products fortified with calcium, fiber and vitamins and minerals, as well as healthier snacks like yogurt, fresh fruit to nutrition bars. Boomers want to prevent or ease conditions associated with aging, so they’re buying fiber, antioxidants, heart-healthy ingredients, vitamins and minerals, omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D, calcium and whole grains.
"Millennials, Boomers and Athletes Drive Emerging Functional Food Trends", Nutraceuticals World, December 17, 2014, © Rodman Media
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Healthy Growth Trends Expected For Syrups, Spreads In U.K.

December 17, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
The syrups and spreads market in the U.K. will grow 22.5 percent over the next four years, according to Canadean. Chocolate spreads will grow the most – 35 percent – through 2018. Honey comes in second (31.3 percent) and jam third (12 percent). Older consumers (55+) are driving growth in the syrups and spreads markets. In jams, jellies and preserves for instance, older consumers account for 37 percent of the market, compared to 12 percent for tweens and early teens. As to chocolate spreads, “an increasing number of older consumers are enjoying products such as Nutella, as they look to indulge in tasty treats more traditionally targeted at children,” according to Canadean.
"Jam, honey and chocolate spreads stick well with UK consumers", Report, Canadean, December 17, 2014, © Canadean Ltd. Part of Progressive Digital Media Group Plc
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Food Companies, Schools Implement Humane Treatment Policies Covering Farm Animals

December 17, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
An alliance of six of six large U.S. school districts (Chicago, Dallas, Miami, Los Angeles, New York and Orlando, Fla.) earlier in December pledged to abide by chicken procurement guidelines that proscribe purchase of chicken that has been treated with antibiotics, raised on feed containing animal by-products or kept in overcrowded cages or coops. Panera Bread, Carnival, Campbell’s, and other big companies have all banned the use of confining gestation crates for pigs. Since 2005, Unilever has required cage-free eggs for Hellman's mayonnaise. California has the strictest humane treatment requirements for egg-laying hens, veal calves and pregnant pigs, though national standards remain elusive.
Heather Clancy, "Panera Bread extends commitment to animal welfare", GreenBiz.com, December 17, 2014, © GreenBiz Group
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Weight Wellness Trend Offers Marketing Opportunities For Big Brands, Entrepreneurs

December 16, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A new report on food, nutrition, and health trends for 2015 says big food businesses are having a tough time selling “weight wellness” products, but small entrepreneurial brands are flourishing. The key reason for this “tipping point” is that consumers are buying “regular foods” to keep their weight under control, attain a trim figure and improve digestive health. All of this is good news for big brands and entrepreneurs tuned into healthy snacks, protein products, foods that provide “good carbs”, dairy (the “natural whole food”), low or no sugar, and foods that are “free from” a host of undesirable ingredients.
Stephen Las Marias, "New Opportunities Emerge as Weight Wellness Hits Tipping Point", Asia Food Journal, December 16, 2014, © Contineo Media Pte Ltd.
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Data On New Food Product Claims Reveal Some Surprises

December 15, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Mintel global data on new food products introduced over the last six years reveal some surprising trends. New products claiming to be kosher topped all categories going back to 2009. More than 26 percent of new foods introduced in 2009 claimed to be kosher, while nearly 41 percent claimed kosher in 2014. The next most frequent claim had to do with allergen-free: i.e., dairy-free, soy-free, etc. In 2009, 8.5 percent made some form of allergen-free claim, while 25 percent made the claim in 2014. Other claims that have increased over the years include: eco-friendly packaging, additive/preservative free, gluten-free, non-GMO, and lactose-free. Claims that have held steady over the same period: all natural, low-fat, low-sugar, high-protein, etc.
Elaine Watson, "Non-GMO, gluten-free, Kosher, vegan, all-natural… What can we learn from claims made on new products in the US in 2014?", NUTRAingredients-usa.com, December 15, 2014, © William Reed Business Media SAS
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Organic Food Goes Mainstream, But Whole Foods Is Undaunted

December 15, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Sales of organic food and nonfood in the U.S. rose 11.5 percent in 2013 after slowing to 4.6 percent during the recession in 2009, according to the Organic trade Association. Organic food is catching on among mainstream retailers, which could be a bad sign for Whole Foods Market. Kroger’s Simple Truth organics and naturals line reached a billion dollars in sales two years after launch. Walmart is expanding its organic food line while keeping prices – usually a 20 percent premium – the same as conventional foods. Another sign of the times: McDonald’s may add organic items to its menu as it tries to boost same-store sales. Whole Foods says it’s not worried by the mainstream organic trend because it adheres to a higher quality standard – and is lowering prices.
Tom Ryan, "This Time, Are Organics Really Going Mainstream? ", CPG Matters, December 15, 2014, © CPGmatters
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U.K. Supermarket Chains Squeezed By Off-Brand Retailers, Upscale Grocers

December 13, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
British supermarket chains are suffering, squeezed by off-brand grocery retailers and local food shops. The country’s 4,000 small food retailers – including farm shops selling locally sourced meat, vegetables and more – are flourishing, despite predictions that they would die out during the recent recession. Instead, they are reporting five to 10 percent increases in turnover. Analysts say the key reason is that the recession changed the way people shop for groceries. They now buy the basics at cheaper supermarkets, such as Aldi and Lidl, and buy bulk online. But, unlike during previous economic slowdowns, consumers are spending the money saved (by buying cheaper staples) on some preferred premium foods, and on locally sourced meats and produce.
"Boutique food shops: Deli-licious", The Economist, December 13, 2014, © The Economist Newspaper Limited
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Fad Coffee Diet Wows Celebrities, But Nutritionists Not So Much

December 12, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A fad diet that comprises coffee, butter and MCT (medium-chain trigycerides) has won over the usual number of gushing celebrities, but also a lot of detractors. Inventor Dave Asprey, described as a “technology entrepreneur and biohacker”, formulated the drink – dubbed “bulletproof” coffee – based on a yak butter tea he drank in Tibet. He claims the drink full of saturated fat is not only good for the brain, it promotes weight loss. But a nutrition professor says the only food that really helps the brain is carbohydrates, which are absent from the coffee concoction. Joan Salge Blake says the drink is more of a marketing triumph – like the grapefruit diet – and “not a breakfast of champions”.
Courtney Rubin, "The Cult of the Bulletproof Coffee Diet", The New York Times, December 12, 2014, © The New York Times Company
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Brasserie-Style Dining Is The Big Trend For 2015 – In London

December 12, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Bloomberg’s chief food critic says he will not base his food trend predictions for 2015 on what is trending in 2014 – the pervasive "rearview mirror" forecasting method. Instead, going “where no man has gone before”, he predicts that “all-day brasserie-style dining” will be a big hit in 2015, in London at least. Generally speaking, a brasserie is a restaurant devoted to casual dining, a step up from a bistro, with one menu served all day. He notes that London’s new Ivy Market Grill joins several other flourishing brasseries in the city, but is nevertheless “the restaurant of the moment, a trend-setter, the future of London dining” – for 2015 anyway
Richard Vines, "Ivy Market Grill Does Brasserie Dining Trend Better Than Its Rivals", Bloomberg, December 12, 2014, © Bloomberg L.P.
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Cricket Flour To Make Bread? The Idea May Bug You

December 4, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Specialty food producers are more conscious than ever of consumer demands for better ingredients, sustainable sourcing and packaging, convenient ways to shop, etc. Consumers are looking for strong flavors, more options in sweeteners, greater variety in snacks. Predictions for 2015 from the Specialty Food Association take these trends into account. Thanks to recent legalization efforts in states like Colorado and Washington, look for greater use of “weed” in baked goods and candies – “for that extra punch”. In the area of protein, producers are introducing alternative sources, including meats and cheeses made from plants, and increased use of cricket flour. According to EXO, a cricket flour producer, crickets are a highly sustainable protein source, 20 times more efficient to raise than cattle.
"Announcing Top 10 Food Trends in Specialty Food for 2015", Specialty Food Association, Inc., December 04, 2014, © Specialty Food Association, Inc.
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Aerated Drinks Increase Stomach Volume, Reduce Appetite

December 3, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A small clinical trial conducted by British and Dutch researchers finds that aerated or foamy drinks decrease appetite enough to be useful as adietary tool. Participants included 20 healthy adult males aged 18 to 60. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to measure volumes of foam, liquid and air layers in the stomachs of the participants. The researchers tested three beverages, each with 110 calories: skimmed-milk powder, xanthan gum and water and lemon syrup. The products were either non-aerated, aerated (foamy) stable, and aerated less stable. The researchers found that the foamy drinks significantly increased gastric volumes and reduced hunger.
Kathryn Murray et al., "Aerated drinks increase gastric volume and reduce appetite as assessed by MRI: a randomized, balanced, crossover trial", The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, December 03, 2014, © American Society for Nutrition
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California Becoming The Hub Of An Heirloom Grain Revolution

December 2, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Despite the controversy over wheat – Staff of life? Cause of many health problems? – a movement is emerging in the U.S., especially in California. Led by “activists” like Sonoko Sakai, an heritage grains advocate who hated the flavor of bread made here, the movement’s goal is to restore the “wheatiness of wheat”. Sakai decided to grow heirloom varieties of wheat in California. A South Carolina grower provided five tons of heirloom seeds, including Sonora wheat, Roman rye, and Red Fife. She found farmers to grow the wheat. The result, compared to industrial flours, “is like night and day”, according to one pastry chef in Los Angeles. “The flavor and the structure, I mean it’s just impressively good.” A second result is the emergence of a “California grain hub” that is specializing in the production and marketing of flours made from heirloom wheat varieties.
Taylor Orci, "Flour Power: California Revives Its Wheat-Growing Past", TakePart, December 02, 2014, © Participant Media
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New Colorado Rules Will Mandate Only Single-Serving Marijuana-Laced Foods

November 26, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Colorado, one of only three states that have legalized recreational marijuana use, has developed rules designed to prevent “dowding”. The term has come into informal use to describe the freaky experience of a New York Times columnist who ate way too much marijuana-laced chocolate. Under the new rules, taking effect in February, edibles containing marijuana can be sold only in single-serving packages. Some marijuana bakeries in the state have already started selling personal-sized portions. One such baker says all of her single-serving baked goods contain 10 mg of THC, about one joint’s worth.
Chris Frates, "In Colorado, Pot pies that get you baked, not burned", Cable News Network , November 26, 2014, © Cable News Network. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc.
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Kellogg’s Bets Some Of Its Breakfast Fare Can Succeed As Anytime Snacks

November 25, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Breakfast cereal companies like Kellogg are having to adjust to a new fast-moving, eat-on-the-go culture. Sagging boxed cereal sales – a two percent drop in the 3rd quarter -- have forced Kellogg’s to expand its product horizons beyond mornings. One possibility is a rebranding into anytime snacks. Kellogg’s is spending a lot of marketing dollars trying to convince people, for example, that its Pop-Tarts brand, once strictly a breakfast toaster pastry, is actually great for lunch or late-night snacking. According to PR Daily, Kellogg’s brand managers view Pop-Tarts as a “stepping stone to a massive expansion and rebranding campaign” that will include crackers, chips and other non-morning snacks.
Ronn Torossian, "How Kellogg's is positioning itself for a rebranding win", PR Daily, November 25, 2014, © Ragan Communications, Inc.
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Weight Watchers Veers Away From Celebrity Spokeswomen In Its New Ads

November 24, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Weight Watchers is abandoning the celebrity endorsement approach to TV advertising, switching instead to commercials that feature actors snacking because they are happy, and also because they are sad, bored, stressed or guilty. The ads link human feelings with eating, acknowledging that losing weight is not easy and suggesting that Weight Watchers provides “help with the hard part” through an extensive support network. The commercials are meant to distinguish the company from its competitors and to be conversation starters among multiple household members who may be watching the same programming, according to their creators.
Andrew Adam Newman, "Weight Watchers Serving Up Understanding to Those Who Eat Their Feelings", The New York Times, November 24, 2014, © The New York Times Company
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Bolivia, Peru Battle For Quinoa Market Share

November 23, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Rising global demand for the grain quinoa has ignited a feud between producer countries Bolivia and Peru. Quinoa is grown organically on smaller farms in Bolivia, leading to higher prices for U.S. and other buyers. In Peru, however, quinoa is produced by agribusinesses using conventional methods, including chemical fertilizers and pesticides. Peruvian quinoa prices are lower, and Bolivia’s growers say they are being priced out of the market. Organic quinoa costs $10 a pound retail in the United States, while non-organic costs $5.00. To save money, some U.S. buyers are mixing organic and conventional quinoa. To better compete, Bolivian producers say they need more government help in certifying organic purity.
"The battle for quinoa: Influx of grain from Peru causes commercial feud with Bolivia", Fox News Latino, November 23, 2014, © Associated Press/FOX News Network, LLC.
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New Coca-Cola Life Fits Today’s Health And Wellness Trend

November 21, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Coca-Cola believes the health and wellness trend is a permanent phenomenon that is having a profound effect on consumers, and consequently on food and beverage companies. Coca-Cola North America President J. Alexander M. Douglas told analysts recently that Americans want fresh and natural food. The company’s new reduced-calorie soft drink, Coca-Cola Life, fits well with that trend. Its formula “tastes great” right now, but is evolving and will eventually have even fewer calories and better flavor. Douglas said the company will keep working on it until “it’s the perfect Coca-Cola for people who are looking for more natural ingredients and natural positioning”.
Eric Schroeder, "Health and wellness trend tees up opportunity for Coca-Cola", Food Business News, November 21, 2014, © SOSLAND PUBLISHING CO.
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Hot Cakes Not Selling Like Hot Cakes, But What About Pancakes?

November 20, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
According to a British food writer, the humble hot cake – “essentially just a pancake” and a “dessert” – is no longer selling like hot cakes. Need proof? Pancake mix sales are down 1.5 percent since 2009, crowded out by brownies, cronuts “and other baked goods”. The premise of Christopher Hooton’s article is amusing, but it is also somewhat confused. In the U.S., at least, pancakes are essentially a breakfast food, not a dessert. Pancake restaurants like the International House of Pancakes (IHOP) chain seem to be doing quite well in the face of competition from brownies and cronuts. The hot cake may be dead – but long live the pancake.
Christopher Hooton, "Hot cakes aren't selling like hot cakes", Independent.co.uk, November 20, 2014, © independent.co.uk
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Maine Grist Mill Breathes New Life Into Organic Flour Production Locally, Nationwide

November 19, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Growing demand for locally grown organic flours led to the creation of Maine’s Somerset Grist Mill, one of whose goals is to “reinvigorate the grain production market” in the state. The Skowhegan stone grist mill itself – acquired in Austria -- stands eight by five feet in a pinewood frame, housed in a 112-year-old former jail. Two round four-foot stones turn slowly atop one another at low temperatures that preserve the nutritional value and taste of the grain grown by local farmers. The product – mostly certified organic flour and rolled oats – is sold wholesale to bakers, grocery stores, and smaller markets in five- and 50-pound bags. The venture faces challenges, like finding skilled manpower and further funding for growth. But it has reinvigorated interest in local milling both in Maine and nationwide.
Kathy O Brozek, "An artisan grain industry takes root in Maine", The Guardian (Maine), November 19, 2014, © Guardian News and Media Limited
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Pastry Shops -- And Shoppers -- Are Paying Closer Attention To Ingredients

November 18, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A key trend in pastry retailing is consumer curiosity about what goes into products and a growing demand for more natural, even locally-sourced, ingredients. Pastry buyers are also willing to try more unusual flavors and formulations. Some bakeries say they have experienced an uptick in sales this year, mainly because of their greater attention to the quality of the ingredients. An Ohio bakery, for example, says it uses only locally-sourced eggs, real butter instead of shortening, and premium chocolate. “The flavor really comes through when you use ingredients like that."
Mark Hamstra, "Try some, buy some: Sampling new tasty pastries", Supermarket News, November 18, 2014, © Penton
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McDonald’s Admits Candy-Flavored Broccoli Was A Flop With Kids

November 14, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
McDonald’s has acknowledged that it tested – unsuccessfully -- bubble gum-flavored broccoli for kids. Flavor is apparently not the only problem kids have with the vegetable, according to the company, which is under pressure to make its kids menu more healthful as it also seeks to revive sales. A company spokesman would not disclose how the gum flavor was added to the broccoli, nor would it say if it was trying other ways to make vegetables more attractive to children. "We're always looking at new food innovations and recipes that will appeal to our customers."
Aimee Picchi, "Why McDonald's created bubble gum-flavored broccoli", CBS News, November 14, 2014, © CBS Interactive Inc.
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Food Industry Hopes To Satisfy The Newly Adventurous, Flavor-Seeking Consumer

November 13, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Flavorists, chefs and food industry trend spotters say today’s consumers are more adventurous, willing to experiment with new, even exotic flavors. The experts have pinpointed five key flavor trends likely to gain favor among shoppers and restaurant patrons in 2015. An obsession with the Taiwanese hot sauce sriracha, for example, typifies the trend of “heat and sweet”, especially among Millennials. Kimchi – spicy pickled cabbage from Korea – is the epitome of a “sour, bitter and tangy” flavor trend. Other trends include umami (the “fifth” flavor); “smoke and oak”, associated with meat but now found in soda, spirits and beer; and Middle Eastern and North African flavors.
Kelly Hensel, "Top 5 Flavor Trends", Institute of Food Technologists, November 13, 2014, © Institute of Food Technologists
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Salad Vending Machines Encounter A Basic Problem: Some People Hate Salad

November 12, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A 28-year-old Chicago-based entrepreneur is betting his future on a belief that if people could find fresh, delicious, convenient – and yes, healthy – food, they would spend money like there was no tomorrow. Luke Saunders’ vending kiosks are designed to deliver on that belief. For seven dollars and up, customers can buy fresh salads made from a variety of healthful ingredients, including blueberries, kale, fennel and pineapple, all delivered in layers in plastic canning-style jars. The Farmer’s Fridge machines are placed where there is a dearth of salad restaurants – in private office buildings, food courts, and convenience stores. They offer more healthful fast foods than McDonald’s or Wendy’s. But in his short experience testing the kiosks, Saunders has encountered one frustrating fact: some people just won’t eat anything but “the usual” -- burgers, pizza, chicken, etc.
Olga Khazan, "The Dreadful Inconvenience of Salad", The Atlantic, November 12, 2014, © The Atlantic Monthly Group
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Dietary Changes Would Benefit The Health Of Humans And The Planet

November 12, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Shifting to a largely plant-based diet would not only make us healthier, it would also be good for the planet, according to U.S. researchers. Their study fused data on the environmental costs of food production – growing fruits, vegetables, grains, etc. vs. raising cattle– as well as diet trends, relationships between diet and health, and population growth. The core problem is that people consume too much refined sugar, refined fats and oils, and land-intense agricultural products like beef. All of this shortens lifespans, while increasing greenhouse gas emissions and reducing land available for endangered species. The solution is to switch to largely Mediterranean, pescatarian (fish) or vegetarian diets.
David Tilman & Michael Clark, "Global diets link environmental sustainability and human health. ", Nature, November 12, 2014, © Macmillan Publishers Limited
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“Bread Lady’s” Small Business Typifies A Growing Trend

November 10, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Every weekend morning, dozens of people in the Cape May, N.J., area drive, bike, or walk to a small farm stand to buy loaves of bread baked that week in a clay wood-fired oven.  A variety of bread flavors are available from the 28-year-old “the bread lady” and her partner, including beet and dill, rosemary and thyme, smoked garlic, and others. Elizabeth Degener – the fourth generation of the family that has owned the farm -- says her “free-form” business is "very lighthearted". It is also an example of a growing trend: people living off the land and supplying local communities with fresh produce and home-produced foods. It’s also perhaps a sign of how far peoples’ tastes in bread have evolved from the Wonder Bread days.
Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer, "Cape May bread maker at forefront of new food movement", Philly.com, November 10, 2014, © Interstate General Media, LLC
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Diet Soda Debate Fed By Inconclusive, Contradictory, Scientific Evidence

November 7, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A new study on the impact of diet sodas on gut microbes contributes more insights -- and probably more confusion – to the debate over whether diet drinks are good or bad for health. Some research suggests that diet drinks do help people cut calories and ward off weight gain. But the new study says diet sodas alter intestinal microbiota in such a way that the risk of metabolic disease, including type 2 diabetes, increases. Skeptics warn that one study among seven people does not provide enough scientific evidence. So, as the debate rages on, everyone agrees that more, and larger, studies are needed to settle the issue.
Allison Aubrey, "Diet Soda May Alter Our Gut Microbes And Raise The Risk Of Diabetes", National Public Radio, November 07, 2014, © NPR
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Market Researcher Examines The “Demonization” Of Sugar

November 7, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Euromonitor summarizes the pros and cons of eating sugar in a new study that tries to put the debate in context as the amount of scientific research linking sugar to obesity increases. Among the cons that contribute to sugar’s “demonization”: refined sugar is addictive; causes tooth decay; has no nutritional value; and has been linked to obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and heart disease. On the other hand, the sugar industry says that sugar alone cannot be blamed for obesity because saturated fats, carbohydrates and sedentary lifestyles also play a role. And sugar makes processed foods more palatable by providing texture and acting as a preservative.
Gina Westbrook, "The Backlash Against Sugar: The Facts", Report, Euromonitor International, November 07, 2014, © Euromonitor International
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Home-Packed School Lunches Tend To Be A Lot Less Healthful -- Study

November 7, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Researchers in Virginia who analyzed the nutritional value of more than 750 school meals with more than 560 packed meals given to pre-K and kindergarten students in three schools over five days found that school lunches were generally more healthful for kids. School lunches were lower in fat and higher in protein, though they did tend to contain more sodium. Packed lunches were less likely to have fruits, vegetables, sugar-free juice and milk, and had more snacks such as chips and crackers. "There were some really healthy packed lunches,” one researcher said. “But overall, they were pretty unhealthy." 
Kathleen Doheny, "School Lunches More Nutritious Than Home-Packed Lunches: Study", HealthDay , November 07, 2014, © HealthDay
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GM Potato Approved By USDA For Planting

November 7, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
The USDA has approved for commercial planting a genetically engineered potato -- dubbed Innate -- that contains less of the suspected carcinogenic chemical acrylamide, which is produced when potatoes are fried. Developed by the privately held J. R. Simplot Company, the new biotech spud also resists bruising, a trait that could reduce costs for growers. The USDA approval is a boon for growers, but is not without controversy. Consumers have been questioning the safety of genetically engineered foods and asking that the products made from them be clearly labeled.
Andrew Pollack, "U.S.D.A. Approves Modified Potato. Next Up: French Fry Fans.", The New York Times, November 07, 2014, © The New York Times Company
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Chicago-Area Peapod Will Now Deliver Barilla Pasta Dinner Kits

November 5, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Peapod grocery delivery in the Chicago area has teamed with Barilla to offer two pre-measured, pre-packaged dinner kits that feature pasta for a family of four. The meal kits can be ordered with any other Peapod grocery delivery order via desktop, smartphone or tablet. The meal kits, based on recipes developed by Barilla chefs, are designed to be prepared in under 30 minutes for less than $5.00 per serving (about $12.00 a kit). The two meal kits are parmesan crusted chicken with spaghetti and baked rotini.
"Barilla and Peapod Introduce Exclusive Pasta Meal Kits as Easy Mealtime Solutions to Chicagoland Families", News release, Barilla, Peapod, November 05, 2014, © Barilla, Peapod
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Unilever Replaces Trans Fats In Spreads With Plant-Based Oils

November 3, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Vegetable oil-based spreads were once marketed as a healthier alternative to butter, but have fallen into disrepute because partially hydrogenated oils (PHOs) create harmful trans fats. Though PHOs have been removed from major spread brands, consumers still see them as highly processed and less natural than butter. To boost the image of spreads, Unilever is removing ingredients that consumers don’t recognize and replacing them with “plant-based oils that you would find in avocados or walnuts”. I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter!, for example, is being advertised as a “delicious blend of plant-based oils, purified water and a pinch of salt”.
Elaine Watson, "Unilever reboots buttery spreads: ‘We know that the perception of artificiality is our biggest barrier’", FOODnavigator-usa.com, November 03, 2014, © William Reed Business Media SAS
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Stevia-Sweetened Coke To Launch in Australia, New Zealand

November 3, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Coca-Cola will introduce its stevia-sweetened Coke beverage in Australia and New Zealand in 2015. Coca-Cola Life, already introduced succcessfully in the U.S. and several South American countries, contains 35 percent less sugar than regular Coke. According to the company, the launch of Coca-Cola Life is “another positive step in fulfilling the business commitment made in July 2013 to offer more lower kilojoule options”.
"Coca-Cola Life sweetened with stevia to launch in Australia and NZ in 2015", Australian Food News, November 03, 2014, © Australian Food News
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Heart, Gut, And Brain: Three Key Focus Areas For Functional Drink Makers

October 25, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Manufacturers of functional drinks should pay attention to several key health concerns among young and old consumers, according to market researcher Canadean. A survey of all age groups found that 75 percent – including many aged 18 to 24 – were "very interested" or "interested" in beverages that promoted a healthy heart. Older consumers, especially women, expressed an interest in drinks that foster gut or digestive health, including those that boost fiber consumption. Brain health drinks were interesting to all ages, but for different reasons. Older consumers want to maintain healthy brain function; middle-age consumers want to prevent cognitive decline; and younger consumers want to boost mental development and sharpness.
"Heart, gut and brain health leading opportunities for functional drinks", Market report, Canadean, October 25, 2014, © Canadean Ltd.
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Genetic Researchers Seek Durum Wheat’s Softer Side

October 22, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Durum wheat is a “hard” wheat typically used to make pasta, but considered unfit for other baked goods. The USDA may have fixed that problem by developing a soft durum variety – without using genetically modified organisms (GMO). They did, however, alter the chromosomes in the wheat kernel by inserting puroindolines, the genes that influence texture and hardness. The result was a softer texture and different size that could still be milled through regular hard durum mills. Testing found that the softer durum flour produced good cookies and pancakes, but not better bread. Further research will involve moving glutenin genes into the soft durum grain to improve dough and gluten strength when baking.
Kacey Culliney , "Non-GMO soft durum wheat promising for bakers, says USDA-ARS", Bakery and Snacks, October 22, 2014, © William Reed Business Media SAS
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Private Label Food Sales Grow As Affordable, Healthy Option For Consumers

October 21, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
With consumers increasingly looking to eat healthy on a budget, private label food products have burnished their image, becoming “trusted, quality lines” that compete well with national brands, a market researcher reports. Private label represented about $106 billion of the $530 billion food and beverage market in 2013, a two percent increase. Private label offers retailers several advantages: higher profit margins than name brands, they help differentiate the retailer from competition, and they help build customer loyalty. Retail dollar sales of private label food and beverages are expected to grow at a CAGR of four percent to $122 billion in 2018.
"Private label expected to grow as consumers seek affordable, healthy food", Institute of Food Technologists , October 21, 2014, © Institute of Food Technologists
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McDonald’s Profit Continues To Sag As It Works To Become More “Relevant”

October 21, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
McDonald’s stock dropped after the company posted a 30 percent drop in third quarter profit and significant declines in restaurant traffic globally. CEO Don Thompson acknowledged the company, which serves 70 million customers a day, has some image problems – is it still relevant? -- especially in an era of growing consumer interest in fresh, unprocessed food. To help solve the problem, Thompson said McDonald's is simplifying menus, tailoring food to local tastes, offering custom burger and sandwich options, rolling out mobile services, and launching a social media "dialogue" with customers.
Lisa Baertlein, "McDonald's CEO acknowledges image problems after tough results", Reuters, October 21, 2014, © Thomson Reuters
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The Brain Makes Food Choices Based On Caloric Content

October 20, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
The human brain chooses one food over another because of its caloric content, the higher the better, according to a Canadian study. Researchers based their conclusions on brains scans and other factors of healthy participants who were asked to look at pictures of different foods and then rate them. They also estimated caloric content. Though they weren’t able to accurately guess calories, the foods they said they would like to eat tended to be the highest calorie ones. “We found that brain activity tracked the true caloric content of foods,” the researchers said, noting that understanding why people choose certain foods could help control the factors that lead to obesity.
Deborah W. Tang et al., "Behavioral and Neural Valuation of Foods Is Driven by Implicit Knowledge of Caloric Content", Psychological Science, October 20, 2014, © Association for Psychological Sciences
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What The World Needs Now: Imprintable Pasta

October 15, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Whether a new technology will change pasta making forever remains to be seen, but the recently unveiled ability to imprint pictures on noodles is capturing a lot of attention. The Pretty Pasta Company of Grand Blanc, Mich., launched with three key ideas: sketching images for a customer’s pasta, adding photos, and personalizing noodles with text and images. The resulting products are completely edible, and boiling for 13 to 15 minutes does not distort the images. Company owner Shawn Murray-Laursen hopes to expand on her innovative pasta technology by offering flavored noodles: bubblegum, blueberry and key lime Moroccan spice.
Eric Dresden, "New Grand Blanc company bills itself as world's first to print photos, messages on edible pasta", MLive.com, October 15, 2014, © MLive Media Group
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Volatility In Global Agriculture Needs To Be Addressed By The World’s Brightest

October 14, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
IT and Internet companies (e.g., Apple, Google) are grabbing a lot of media attention lately, but hardly anybody is paying attention to agricultural activity, which is “breaking records”, according to The Atlantic’s Moisés Naím. Worldwide wheat production is at the highest levels ever, and farms and granaries are over-flowing, mainly because high prices have encouraged farmers to boost cultivation. High prices are the result of population growth, increased food consumption in poor countries, the use of grains to make fuels, and frequent extreme climate events. Lower prices will lead to production declines -- the cycle continues. The key problem, Naím says, is that greater food-related volatility will lead to social and geopolitical instability affecting millions of people globally. He suggests that the geniuses in high tech might want to try solving the puzzle.
Moises Naim, "The World Is Full of Grain", Moisesnaim.com, October 14, 2014, © Moises Naim
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Consumer Pressure On Flavor Companies Mounts

October 9, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Consumer and environmental groups have asked the FDA to take a closer look at the currently self-regulated flavors industry to make sure so-called natural and artificial flavors are really safe. Consumer watchdog scientists argue that if the stuff is so safe, why is it so secret? The global flavor industry is pegged at about $23.91 billion, up 19 percent from $20 billion in 2000, about half of which is for food, the other half for fragrances. The Flavors and Extract Manufacturers Association says it has found around 3,000 different flavors to be safe, and most are used in minute quantities. FEMA companies worry that disclosing their ingredients even in such small amounts, would spur more consumer complaints, something flavor companies would like to avoid. Nevertheless, consumer concern about the safety of ingredients is increasing steadily.
Candice Choi, "Natural and artificial 'flavors' fuel food industry but remain a mystery", Startribune.com, October 09, 2014, via Associated Press, © Associated Press/StarTribune.com
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Big Growth In Consumption Of Tea, Bottled Water Over Last Five Years

October 3, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Consumption of bottled water and tea represented 55 percent of overall beverage market growth between 2008 and 2013, according to food and drink industry consultant Zenith International. Tea consumption grew by 62 billion liters, the largest of the 24 beverage categories in 72 countries. Bottled water consumption increased by 83 billion liters. Volume consumption of milk grew by 20 billion liters; coffee grew by 16 billion liters. The company noted that carbonates have slipped behind milk, and coffee has overtaken beer. Another notable trend: “a huge increase” in beverage choices, with more flavors, blends, packs, sweeteners, outlets and delivery options.
"Bottled water and tea lead global drinks growth", Report, Zenith International, October 03, 2014, © Zenith International
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