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Shoppers Are Wary Of GMO Foods, But Stingy When It Comes To Buying Non-GMO

February 18, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
NPD Group market research finds that grocery shoppers may be cautious of GMO foods and beverages, but not enough to get them to pay a premium for non-GMO foods. Half of respondents to a survey said they were concerned about genetically modified organisms in their food, but two-thirds said they would not pay a premium for foods that were GMO-free. NPD advised food manufacturers and retailers to help educate consumers about GMOs. And marketers who want to inform consumers about GMOs and their products “should engage both traditional and social media for effective communication avenues”.
"Two-thirds of Primary Grocery Shoppers Will Not Pay More for Non-GMO Products, but Half of Specialty Store Shoppers Will, Reports NPD", Report, The NPD Group, February 18, 2014, © The NPD Group, Inc.
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Stevia Offers Marketing Opportunities For Beverage Makers

February 15, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Beverage makers that want to substitute the natural sweetener stevia for sugar in their product formulas should be aware of a key marketing advantage. Stevia-based beverages can have a significant impact on overweight and obese populations, because a person who drinks two cans of a stevia soft drink a day could cut their annual calorie consumption by 6,132 calories. Companies looking to reformulate with stevia should focus on carbonated beverages, flavored water, fruit and vegetable juices and RTD teas, Euromonitor advises. They should target markets where those types of beverages – especially reduced-sugar varieties – are already consumed heavily.
Diana Cowland, "Stevia: Adding Value Through Natural - The Resurgence of Reduced Sugar", Euromonitor International, February 15, 2014, © Euromonitor International
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Ingredients Suppliers Are A Better Investment Bet Than Consumer Goods Companies

February 14, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Shares of consumer goods makers like Nestlé and Unilever, at the mercy of consumer spending trends, may have lost their luster for investors, but suppliers to those companies are less vulnerable, and thus more attractive. The main reason is that health and wellness trends – like a growing distaste for artificial ingredients – are driving consumer goods giants to reformulate their products. That’s good news for scent and flavor makers such as Symrise, Givaudan and International Flavors & Fragrances, and food ingredient purveyors like Glanbia and Kerry Group. Analysts say, for example, that European food ingredients companies on average will see a six percent profit rise in 2014, though European food producers will stagnate.
Martinne Geller, "Analysis - No appetite for big consumer goods? Try their suppliers", Reuters, February 14, 2014, © Thomson Reuters
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New Smartphone App Accesses Nutritional Data on 80,000 U.K. Food Items

February 13, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A  "traffic light"-based nutrition data smartphone app known as FoodSwitch has been launched in the U.K. The app, developed by the Consensus Action on Salt and Health, provides nutritional advice on 80,000 packaged foods and drinks. Using their smartphone cameras and the new app in the supermarket, shoppers scan barcodes on food packages to access traffic light color-coded nutritional data based on the front-of-pack hybrid coding model. FoodSwitch is a free, U.K.-only download from iTunes and Google Play for Apple and Android devices.
Ian Quinn, "FoodSwitch app launched to 'expose hidden dangers of food'", The Grocer, February 13, 2014, © William Reed Business Media Ltd 2014
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Produce Marketers Get A Boost From Some Powerful Allies

February 7, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Producers of snacks and other food items made from fresh fruits and vegetables are getting a marketing boost from powerful allies besides First Lady Michelle Obama: Sesame Workshop (owner of the Sesame Street characters), the Disney company, and school cafeterias. Disney, often criticized for licensing its characters to sell junk food, has lately begun licensing to companies that sell snacks made from fresh produce. Sesame Workshop has been letting the Produce Marketing Association use characters like Elmo and Big Bird – free of charge – to promote fresh fruit and vegetables to children. And efforts by school cafeterias to offer more fruits and veggies, both à la carte and in vending machines, has resulted in a 26 percent hike in students’ daily consumption of fruit, and a 14 percent increase in veggie eating.
Simone Baroke , "Sesame Street and Sugar Coating Sell Fruit and Vegetables to Children", Euromonitor International, February 07, 2014, © Euromonitor International
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Independent Pizza Shops Take It On The Chin As “Big Pizza” Thrives On Web Ordering

February 6, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
The move by big pizza chains to Web-based ordering systems – now accounting for 40 percent of total sales – has put the squeeze on less technologically savvy, poorer independent chains and shops. Large pizza chains, which already have marketing clout and lower cost ingredients, accounted for 52 percent of pizza orders, while the share for independents dropped to 29 percent from 31.5 percent. One pizza shop owner in Ohio reports a 20 percent decline in sales as a result of the Webification of pizza ordering. One possible solution for the little guys is online food ordering companies like Chicago-based GrubHub Seamless, which usually take a cut of online sales transacted via their platform.
Julie Jargon, "Big Pizza Chains Use Web Ordering To Slice Out Bigger Market Share", The Wall Street Journal, February 06, 2014, © Dow Jones & Company, Inc
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Groups Representing GM Food Producers Ask FDA’s Help On Voluntary Product Labeling

February 6, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A new coalition of 28 groups representing farmers, seed companies and other food producers that rely on genetically modified ingredients has joined the Grocery Manufacturers Association to  ask the FDA to develop guidelines for labeling – voluntarily – GM products. The GMA, which spent a lot of money torpedoing GM labeling ballot initiatives in California and Washington, is now  acknowledging that consumers want to know if their food contains GM ingredients. The coalition admitted that getting the FDA involved might pre-empt future state ballot initiatives, which could turn as messy and costly as those in California and Washington.
Eliza Barclay, "Food Industry Groups Say They'll Label GMOs, On Their Terms", NPR, February 06, 2014, © NPR
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Subway To Remove Controversial Texture-Improving Chemical From Its Breads

February 6, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Subway is removing a controversial chemical from its bread that, though FDA approved at certain maximum levels, poses a small carcinogenic risk to humans, according to the Center for Science in the Public Interest. Azodicarbonamide, a chemical found in yoga mats and shoe soles, is used to strengthen bread dough. According to the American Bakers Association, the chemical improves the volume and texture of a finished loaf, and substitute chemicals “are likely not to work as well". The chemical is also used in grocery store breads, restaurant breads and breads sold by other major fast food chains, including McDonald's, Starbucks and Arby's.
Elizabeth Landau, "Subway to remove 'dough conditioner' chemical from bread", CNN, February 06, 2014, © Cable News Network. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc.
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American Teens Consume Way Too Much Salt, Study Finds

February 3, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Almost all adolescents in a cross-sectional U.S. study reported consuming double the amount of salt recommended daily, pretty much the same amount as adults, putting them in danger of obesity and damaging inflammation. Researchers gathered self-reported data from 766 healthy teenagers, finding that 97 percent exceeded the American Heart Association’s recommended daily intake of 1,500 mg of sodium. The study adjusted for what the teens ate and drank, and still found a correlation between salt intake and obesity. The high-sodium consumers also had high levels of a compound secreted by immune cells that contributes to chronic inflammation and to autoimmune diseases like lupus and arthritis.
H. Zhu et al., "Dietary Sodium, Adiposity, and Inflammation in Healthy Adolescents", Pediatrics, February 03, 2014, © American Academy of Pediatrics
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Taking Quinoa A Step Or Two Further In The Cooking Process Yields Tasty Results

January 29, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Turns out, quinoa is not really a grain, but a “chenopod” related to spinach and beets. That fact has not diminished its popularity among foodies worldwide as a base for a salad, pilaf or risotto. But if you cook it long enough, until its starches begin to release, quinoa can be shaped into cakes for pan-frying, without using bread crumbs or eggs. New York Time Food writer Mark Bittman says quinoa is really tasty when transformed into crunchy crumbs that have been seasoned and roasted. They can be sprinkled on salads, stir-fry dishes, pastas or anything else as a substitute for toasted bread crumbs or chopped nuts.
Mark Bittman, "Just When You Thought Quinoa Couldn’t Be Crunchier", The New York Times, January 29, 2014, © The New York Times Company
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Reckitt Benckiser Enters U.S. Supplement Market With Omega-3 Product

January 27, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Reckitt Benckiser is entering the U.S. dietary supplement market with the launch of an omega-3 krill oil product. The company has hired British public relations agency GolinHarris London to introduce MegaRed Omega-3 Krill Oil to American consumers. It is the first time the agency has worked with RB. Celebrity brand ambassador will be Gabby Logan, supported by media doctor Ellie Cannon and celebrity fitness trainer James Daly. The theme of the campaign will be the role played by omega-3 fatty acids in heart health in women over age 45.
John Reyolds, "Reckitt Benckiser appoints GolinHarris for food supplement launch", PR Week, January 27, 2014, © Haymarket Media Group Ltd
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PepsiCo Backs Away From Claiming Products Are “Natural”

January 24, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
PepsiCo is the latest company to ditch the labeling claim “natural” in some products to avoid angering litigious consumers who strongly believe “natural” products should contain no synthetic or GMO ingredients. Because the FDA hasn’t yet imposed a definition of natural, companies have been mostly free to apply the claim on products, setting off waves of lawsuits. To sidestep the problem, PepsiCo is gradually replacing “natural” with “simply” on packages. “Simply Natural” Frito-Lay potato chips are now “Simply”, though it hasn’t changed the ingredients. “Natural Quaker Granola” is now “Simply Quaker Granola”. Other companies that have made similar changes in labeling include Ben & Jerry's and Breyers ice cream products and Campbell Soup’s Pepperidge Farm Goldfish crackers.
Candice Choi, "PepsiCo rebrands 'Natural' products with 'Simply'", The Big Story, January 24, 2014, © The Associated Press
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GM Purple Tomato Juice Heads To Market In U.K.

January 24, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Juice made from genetically-modified purple tomatoes that are reportedly more nutritious than the conventional varieties is beginning to reach store shelves in the U.K.. Purple tomatoes are engineered to contain the pigment anthocyanin, the same antioxidant that gives blueberries their nutritional – and anti-cancer – punch. The tomatoes were developed at a research center in the U.K.. Large-scale production of the purple tomato juice has begun in Canada, with the first 1,200 liters ready to ship. Ontario company New Energy Farms produces enough purple tomatoes in its greenhouse to make 2,000 liters (440 gallons) of juice. The tomatoes do not contain seeds, so there is no risk of contamination by genetically-modified organisms (GMOs).
David Shukman, "Genetically-modified purple tomatoes heading for shops", BBC News, January 24, 2014, © BBC
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FDA Proposes Updates To Food Labels

January 24, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
The FDA has sent two proposals for food label revisions to the White House for review. The proposed changes – the first in 21 years – are likely to take into account the trends and developments in food and health that have occurred since the last revisions in 1993, especially the emphasis on obesity. According to Bloomberg, the new labels will probably feature calories more prominently, highlight natural versus added sugar content, and make serving sizes conform to reality. Once approved by the Obama administration, the label changes will be published for public comment.
Anna Edney , "U.S. Food Labels to Get First Update by FDA in 21 Years", Bloomberg, January 24, 2014, © Bloomberg L.P.
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Ethiopia’s Grain Teff Could Be Healthy Substitute For Wheat Flour

January 23, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
About 6.3 million farmers in Ethiopia cultivate a highly nutritious grain – teff – that is finding its way into health food stores and supermarkets in Europe and North America. Rich in calcium, iron, amino acids and protein, and gluten-free, teff can be substituted for wheat flour in bread, pasata, waffles and pizza dough. The grain has been around for a long time, But a growing appetite for traditional crops, and burgeoning demand for healthier and gluten-free foods, are enlivening the marketing prospects for the grain, “touted as Ethiopia's ‘second gift to the world’ after coffee”. One problem: government regulations from 2006 ban export of the raw grain. Only processed products can be exported.
Claire Provost and Elissa Jobson, "Move over quinoa, Ethiopia's teff poised to be next big super grain", The Guardian, January 23, 2014, © Guardian News and Media Limited
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Consumers Eating Less Red Meat For Health Reasons, Or They’re Buying Better Quality Cuts

January 22, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A lot of consumers surveyed by Mintel say they ate less red meat -- or better quality meat -- in 2013. Thirty-nine percent say they ate less beef or other red meat, and 25 percent ate less pork. Despite the trend, some 10 percent ate more red meat, and 13 percent ate more pork. According to the market researcher, the drop in red meat consumption is due almost totally to concerns about eating too much fat and cholesterol. Of those who continue to eat red meat regularly, about 16 percent admit to trading up to higher quality cuts of meat, an “opportunity” for marketers.
"More than one-third of Americans cut back on red meat for health reasons", Report, Mintel, January 22, 2014, © Mintel Group Ltd.
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Though A Debatable Issue, Whole Foods To Ban Use Of Sludge-Based Fertilizers By Its Growers

January 21, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
The safety of sludge (AKA biosolids) – the byproduct of processing municipal waste, including human body waste – as a fertilizer is a debatable issue. But Whole Foods Market, perhaps influenced by anti-sludge activists, has decided it’s definitely bad for customers, and for business. Anti-sludgists say biosolids are loaded with heavy metals and pharmaceuticals that render fertilizers toxic and dangerous. Scientists who have studied biosolids, however, disagree, saying they offer big environmental benefits. At any rate, a new produce rating system being launched by Whole Foods in September will bar its growers from using biosolids. The company acknowledges that none currently use the stuff on their fields.
Eliza Barclay, "Whole Foods Bans Produce Grown With Sludge. But Who Wins?", Report, NPR, January 21, 2014, © NPR
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Ancient And Exotic Foreign Grains Capture Foodies’ Attention

January 21, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Among the emerging food trends on display at a recent San Francisco fancy food show were some exotic grains seeking to fill the vacuum left by the decline in popularity of plain old white bread. Quinoa, buckwheat, teff and sorghum continue to intrigue consumers. But also  more obscure offerings like freekeh, a roasted green wheat from the Middle East with a nutty, smoky flavor. One bakery at the show featured ready-to-cook freekeh blends: apricot and raisin, herb and currant, and mushroom and herb. Also on the radar: an ancient Italian cereal grain known as faro or emmer, high-end ramen noodles, and Peruvian corn snacks called cancha.
Elizabeth Weise, "Ancient, Peruvian cuisine are hot food trends", USATODAY , January 21, 2014, © Gannett/USA Today
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Fortified Mediterranean Diet Cuts Risk Of Artery-Blocking Disease

January 21, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A seven-year clinical trial conducted in Spain among more than 7,000 men and women over age 55 has found a significant association between a fortified Mediterranean diet and a lower risk of peripheral artery disease (PAD). In peripheral arterial disease plaque – fat, cholesterol, calcium, etc. – builds up in the arteries that carry blood to the head, organs, and limbs, leading to atherosclerosis (hardening). The study confirmed that a Mediterranean diet fortified either with extra virgin olive oil or nuts reduced the risk of PAD in participants.
Miguel Ruiz-Canela et al., "Association of Mediterranean Diet With Peripheral Artery Disease", JAMA, January 21, 2014, © American Medical Association
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“Food Hubs” Serve As Marketing Outlets For Smaller Local Farms

January 16, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A growing trend among smaller local food producers is the use of a “food hub” to reach larger markets. A food hub is a central unit, like meat processor This Old Farm in Colfax, Indiana, that collectively markets the products of member farms. That way, the smaller farms better meet the demands of customers. About 222 hubs operate around the country, 62 percent of whom have been in operation only five years or less. Established in 2009, This Old Farm's hub is now marketing for more than 75 local farms.
Mikel Livingston, "'Food hubs' feed consumer demand for local produce", jconline.com , January 16, 2014, © jconline.com/Gannett
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Organic, Healthy Food Gaining A Toehold Among The Under-30 Crowd

January 10, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Recent surveys have found that adults under 30 – and even teenagers – are increasingly attracted to healthier foods, including organic. Companies are interested in trends like this because they signal what the food-purchasing future may hold, i.e., if kids like organic now, they will carry that preference into adulthood. A Piper Jaffray & Co. survey found that teens increasingly choose organic food options: 39 percent said they eat  organics versus just 33 percent two years ago. A survey by Jeffries and AlixPartners in 2013 found that 58 percent of adults born between 1982 and 2001 (millennials) were willing to pay more to buy natural or organic food products, compared to only 43 percent of baby boomers.
Rick Montgomery, "More young people turn to organic foods", postcrescent.com , January 10, 2014, © postcrescent.com/Gannett
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USDA Deems Greek Yogurt Pilot Program In Schools A Success

January 9, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
The USDA’s three-month Greek yogurt pilot program conducted in schools in New York and three other states was “a great success,” Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) announced. New York is a major producer of Greek yogurt, and is home to some of the largest Greek yogurt and dairy producers, including Chobani. During the program, schools in New York, Tennessee, Idaho and Arizona consumed 200,000 pounds of high-protein Greek yogurt worth $300,000, Schumer said. The pilot program was designed to test the cost-effectiveness of the USDA purchasing Greek yogurt for schools that participate in the National School Lunch Program. The USDA is likely to expand the program nationwide.
Mark Weiner, "Schumer: Kids eat up Chobani yogurt in USDA school lunch test", Syracuse, January 09, 2014, © Syracuse Media Group
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Full-Service Restaurants Do Not Inform Customers About Nutritional Count Of Their Meals

January 8, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
U.S. researchers who studied more than 2,600 full-service restaurant menus report that entrees, appetizers and side dishes served in these eateries are high in calories, saturated fat and sodium. Nutrition information provided at these restaurants – including 21 national chains – lags behind information provided by fast-food chains. The researchers said restaurants need to educate customers about the nutritional content of their foods because consumers eating out often choose energy-dense, high-sodium meals that lead to numerous diet-related diseases and conditions, beginning with obesity.
Amy Auchincloss et al., "Nutritional Value of Meals at Full-service Restaurant Chains", Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, January 08, 2014, © Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior
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Heritage Grains Movement Spreads Globally, Attracts Documentarian’s Attention

January 6, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A grassroots movement has sprung up around the world whose goal is to find and cultivate heirloom grains as a nutritious, tasty substitute for refined wheat flour. One Arizona farmer who is growing a wheat grain known as White Sonora joins others not only in that state but in the Carolinas, New York, Massachusetts, Canada, the U.K. and Denmark. Besides White Sonora, which has apparently been around for at least 300 years, Steve Sossaman has added Emmer Wheat, Red Fife and Beardless Russian varieties and is experimenting with other grains. Sossaman’s efforts, along with those of others, will be featured in an upcoming documentary film called "The Grain Divide," currently in production.
Srianthi Perera , "Agritopia resident creates film celebrating revival of grains", The Arizona Republic , January 06, 2014, © Gannett/azcentral.com
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Fiber-Rich Diet Reduces Risk Of Asthma, Study FInds

January 6, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A Swiss study finds that the risk of developing asthma rises if a person’s diet lacks the fiber found in fruits and vegetables. The immune response in the lungs is influenced by the fatty acids in the blood stream created when intestinal bacteria ferment dietary fiber. The study conducted in mice shows that a lack of fermentable fibers in the diet paves the way for allergic inflammatory reactions in the lungs. The problem is growing in areas of the world where the Western diet prevails because fruit and vegetables are playing an ever smaller role in people's diets.
Aurélien Trompette et al., "Gut microbiota metabolism of dietary fiber influences allergic airway disease and hematopoiesis", Nature Medicine, January 06, 2014, © Nature Publishing Group
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Fortified Indian Snack May Help Solve India’s Child Nutrition Problem

January 2, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A nutrient-dense version of a traditional Indian snack could go a long way toward relieving the child malnutrition problem in the country. About 45,000 children die of malnutrition in the state of Maharashtra each year. In a recent pilot study, half of the participating children were diagnosed as severely malnourished. For the study, a researcher developed a recipe for laddoos, donut-hole shaped snacks served at Indian festivals, consisting of whole wheat flour, roasted peanuts, milk, cardamom, butter, sesame seed, and cane juice pressed into cakes. During the study, more than half of the children who regularly ate the fortified laddoos went from severely malnourished to moderately malnourished.
Sydney Brownstone , "A Small, Round Indian Dessert With Hidden Malnutrition-Fighting Powers", Co.Exist, January 02, 2014, © Mansueto Ventures, LLC
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New Snack Subscription And Delivery Service Unveiled By General Mills

December 31, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
General Mills has launched a snack delivery service – “Nibblr” – that offers 59 portion-controlled snack varieties shipped by the U.S. Postal Service to subscribers. Subscribers control what they get, how often, and can cancel anytime. The service is available in the continental U.S.; snacks are delivered weekly, biweekly or monthly. Nibblr snacks – packed four to a box and sold for $5.99 each – include nuts (Clusters Last Stand), fruits, chocolate and a variety of flavors, including curry, chili pepper and chai (Chai It You’ll Like It).
"General Mills rolls out subscription snacks by mail", Nick Halter, December 31, 2013, © American City Business Journals
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Latin America Moves Forward With Stiffer Regulation Of Junk Foods

December 27, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Though initiatives to curb consumption of junk foods and to encourage healthful eating have often failed in developed countries – including the U.S. – similar legislation by left-leaning governments in Central and South America has passed relatively easily and “just might stick”. In the last year, Peru, Uruguay and Costa Rica have made it illegal to serve junk food in public schools. Ecuador now requires a “traffic light” nutritional labeling system that warns about high levels of salt, sugar and fat in foods. The food industry in that country will soon be barred from using pictures of animal characters, cartoon personalities and celebrities to promote unhealthy food to kids. And Mexican legislators passed taxes on snacks like potato chips and on sugary beverages.
Amy Guthrie, "Junk Food Feels the Heat in Latin America", The Wall Street Journal, December 27, 2013, © Dow Jones & Company, Inc
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Anti-Wheat Sentiment Persists, At Least Among America’s Dietitians

December 26, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
A survey of more than 500 dietitians finds 14 trends that will make, headlines, influence food purchases and “shape Americans’ waistlines”. At the top of the list is a persistent negative attitude toward wheat. Americans will avoid wheat-based food products, turning instead to diets like the Paleo diet, gluten-free and “wheat belly”, a plan based on a popular anti-wheat book. Other trends highlighted by dietitians include: ancient grains; kale, coconut and chia seeds; low carb diets; eco-conscious eats; and fruits and vegetables.
"14 Top Diet Trends For 2014", News release, Today's Dietitian, December 26, 2013, © Today's Dietitian
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Allergy Rates Lower Among Children Whose Moms Ate Peanuts While Pregnant

December 23, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Contrary to traditional medical opinion, pregnant women should not worry that eating peanuts will cause a peanut allergy in their child, U.S. researchers report. For years women were advised to avoid highly allergenic foods such as peanuts and tree nuts during pregnancy and while nursing. In addition, it was suggested that children three years old and younger should not be allowed to eat peanuts. The researchers noted that despite the advice, from 1997 to 2007 the number of peanut allergy cases in the U.S. tripled. Researchers analyzed data collected from  8,205 children, finding that peanut allergy rates were significantly lower among children whose mothers ate peanuts before and during pregnancy.
A. Lindsay Frazier et al., "Prospective Study of Peripregnancy Consumption of Peanuts or Tree Nuts by Mothers and the Risk of Peanut or Tree Nut Allergy in Their Offspring", JAMA Pediatrics, December 23, 2013, © American Medical Association
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Harmful Dietary Supplements Contribute To Alarming Rise In Drug-Related Liver Injuries In U.S.

December 21, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Drug-related liver injuries are on the rise, thanks to increased use of dietary supplements, a $32 billion industry in the U.S. largely unregulated and built on often-unproven claims that products will help people lose weight, build muscle or ward off a host of chronic illnesses. According to new U.S. research, dietary supplements account for nearly 20 percent of drug-related liver injuries serious enough to require hospital care. That’s a seven percent increase, and may actually undercount the total number of cases. Studies show that the market has been deluged with adulterated and mislabeled products, and products packaged in potentially unsafe dosages.
The supplement industry says most products are safe, but acknowledges that harmful, contaminated products – often bodybuilding supplements tainted with steroids – are sold by a “criminal” fringe of suppliers.
Anahad O’Connor, "Spike in Harm to Liver Is Tied to Dietary Aids", The New York Times, December 21, 2013, © The New York Times Company
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CDC Says That, Except For Young Kids, Most Americans Still Consume Too Much Salt

December 20, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s report on eight years of data (2003 – 2010) on sodium intake in the U.S. says there were small declines in the prevalence of excess sodium intake among children through age 13, but none in adolescents or adults. “Despite slight declines in some groups, the majority of the U.S. population aged greater than or equal to one year consumes excess sodium,” the CDC notes. The agency adds that reducing sodium intake is a national health priority because excess sodium intake can lead to hypertension, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.
"Trends in the Prevalence of Excess Dietary Sodium Intake — United States, 2003–2010 ", Report, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, December 20, 2013, © Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Daily Apple – Or Statin – Equally Likely To Keep The Doctor Away

December 17, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Eating just one apple a day would prevent or delay around 8,500 vascular deaths such as heart attacks and strokes every year among adults over age 50 in the U.K., a British study has found. The same result could also be achieved, perhaps with more side effects and complications like muscular myopathy, by taking statins each day. The researchers used mathematical models to analyze the effect of eating an apple a day on common causes of “vascular mortality”. Subjects in the study did not already take statins. A daily statin given to 17.6 million more adults would reduce vascular deaths by 9,400 a year, while a daily apple given to 22 million Britons over 50 years would prevent 8,500 vascular deaths.
A. D. M. Briggs et al., "A statin a day keeps the doctor away: comparative proverb assessment modeling study", BMJ, December 17, 2013, © Briggs et al.
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Genetic Engineering Could Provide A Defense Against Today’s Agricultural Plagues

December 17, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Though organic food advocates won’t agree, a variety of agricultural afflictions – disease, drought, storms, heat, insects – is making the use of genetically modified plants an attractive answer to the question: How will we feed the world? In Ireland, for example, potato blight, a familiar scourge, continues to be a problem. The country’s agricultural agency, Teagasc, is testing whether GM potato plants modified with a resistant gene from South American plants can withstand the blight. Turns out, the plant “has performed well”. But because of controversy over use of GM plants raging in Europe and elsewhere, Irish farmers won’t have access to the new strain, perhaps for a very long time.
David Rotman , "Why We Will Need Genetically Modified Foods", MIT Technology Review, December 17, 2013, © MIT Technology Review
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TV Ads Seen By Kids In 2009 Touted Unhealthful Foods, Drinks

December 17, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Foods and drinks advertised on TV programs – both children’s and others – in 2009 were generally less nutritious than foods promoted during regular broadcast hours, according to a new U.S. study. Researchers analyzed Nielsen TV ratings data from 2009 to determine what kind of food advertising children were exposed to. They then analyzed the nutritional content of the foods advertised on shows with a child-audience share of 35 percent of greater. More than 84 percent of food and beverage ads seen by children, ages 2 to 11, on all programming touted products high in fats, sugars and sodium. On children's programming, more than 95 percent of ads were for products high in those unhealthy ingredients.
Lisa Powell et al. , "Nutritional Content of Food and Beverage Products in Television Advertisements Seen on Children's Programming", Childhood Obesity, December 17, 2013, © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
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Indiana Bakery Owner Thrives By Delivering Healthful Products For Special Needs

December 16, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Working under the theory that “bad” bacteria in her autistic daughter’s gut – nourished by preservatives, refined sugars, and corn starches – were encouraging her symptoms, a baking entrepreneur created a product line that turned out to have wide appeal. Nutty Bakery (Indiana) owner Amy Ervin bakes her products – gluten free and lactose free – using coconut or almond flour and none of the “unhealthy” stuff. Her baked goods "starve" the bad bacteria, she believes. She also sells organic bakery items for “paleo”, vegan and other specialized diets. Customers include cross-fit trainers and parents of autistic children. Most of her orders come from her Web site, and she ships all around the U.S.
Lisa Perry, "Special Foods Specialist", The Courier-Times (New Castle, Indiana), December 16, 2013, © 1up! Software
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Pediatricians Caution Against Consumption Of Raw Milk By Babies, Pregnant Women

December 16, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Expectant mothers, babies and young children should not consume unpasteurized (raw) milk or milk products – which can be legally purchased in 30 U.S. states – and should only consume pasteurized products, the American Academy of Pediatrics advises. Raw milk and milk products are a continuing source of bacterial infections that are especially dangerous to pregnant women, fetuses, the elderly, young children and people with compromised immune systems, the organization says. Raw milk and raw-milk products, such as soft cheeses, have become increasingly popular, because of unfounded claims of health benefits. From 1998 through 2009, there were 93 recorded outbreaks of disease resulting from consumption of raw milk or raw-milk products, causing 1,837 illnesses, 195 hospitalizations and two deaths.
Yvonne Maldonado et al., "Consumption of Raw or Unpasteurized Milk and Milk Products by Pregnant Women and Children", Pediatrics, December 16, 2013, © American Academy of Pediatrics
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Multivitamins “Should Be Avoided”, Studies Say

December 16, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Two new clinical trials testing the health impact of dietary and other supplements found that most, including multivitamins, not only are useless at preventing chronic disease or death, some increase the risk of death among generally well-nourished populations. In an editorial accompanying the studies, clinicians and public health experts said the use of supplements is “not justified, and they should be avoided”. Vitamin industry representatives countered by saying a study reported last year on 15,000 men found that multivitamins reduced cancer risk. Worldwide vitamin industry sales in 2012 were $23.4 billion, up three percent from 2011. Forty percent of Americans say they took multivitamins or minerals between 2003 and 2006.
Jeanne Whalen, "Multivitamins Found to Have Little Benefit", The Wall Street Journal, December 16, 2013, © Dow Jones & Co. Inc
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A Healthy Diet Does Cost More, But Is Offset By Much Lower Healthcare Costs

December 15, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Harvard scientists have figured out that it really is more expensive to eat healthy, but not that much more – only $1.50 a day, or $550 a year. In a meta-analysis of 27 studies across 10 affluent countries that compared the costs of eating healthy versus less-healthy meals, the researchers found that healthier diet patterns – for example, diets rich in fruits, vegetables, fish, and nuts – cost significantly more than unhealthy diets (i.e., those rich in processed foods, meats, and refined grains). The researchers said the price difference is very small in comparison to the economic costs of diet-related chronic diseases, “which would be dramatically reduced by healthy diets”.
Mayuree Rao et al., "Do Healthier Foods and Diet Patterns Cost More Than Less Healthy Options? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis", BMJ Open, December 15, 2013, © Rao et al.
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China Bans Northwest U.S. Shellfish Imports Because of Contamination

December 12, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Geoduck clams, oysters and other two-shelled bivalves harvested off the coasts of Washington, Oregon, Alaska and Northern California have been banned from import into China, because of a contamination problem. Chinese government inspectors discovered that some of the clams were tainted with arsenic and a toxin that causes paralytic shellfish poisoning. U.S. officials are waiting for more information from China to determine the source of the contamination. The open-ended ban is seen as a major blow to the $270 million Northwest U.S. shellfish industry.
Ashley Ahearn and Katie Campbell and Anthony Schick, "China Imposes First-Ever West Coast Shellfish Ban", KUOW.org, December 12, 2013, © ERTHFX
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Rosy Future For Functional Food Companies That Target World’s Aging Population

December 12, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
According to market researcher Euromonitor, the aging population in North America, Western Europe and Australasia remains very willing to spend money on functional foods that offer preventative health benefits, even during an economic downturn. Knowledge of this fact should be encouraging to producers of fortified and functional foods, as long as the products are perceived as effective and offering added value, Euromonitor says. The greatest success so far among the aging population has been among products providing cardiovascular health. Other claims haven’t really fared so well. These include product launches that purport to maintain bone density, brain health and memory, and vision health.
Diana Cowland, "What is the functional food magic number? Why, 0.84 of course…", Nutraingredients, December 12, 2013, © William Reed Business Media SAS
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Campbell’s Cooks, Bakers Identify Hot Culinary Trends For 2014

December 4, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Campbell Soup Company’s Culinary & Baking Institute (CCBI) has published a list of major culinary trends for 2014, including sophisticated sweets, savory yogurt and bolder burgers. The CCBI – a network of Campbell’s chefs, bakers and culinary professionals – identifies and categorizes food topics that may have the greatest on the food industry. The group follows the trends as they evolve through six stages, from the discovery phase (e.g., fine dining restaurants and cultural hot spots) to universal appeal and international availability. Among the other top trends for the coming year: Brazilian cuisine, food waste awareness, fresh juices, and beverage-Inspired flavors.
"2014 Campbell Culinary TrendScape Report", Report, Campbell Soup Company, December 04, 2013, © CSC Brands, L.P.
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Yogurt Marketers Now Stressing High Protein Content In Product Launches

December 3, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Problems over health claims of yogurts containing probiotics have pushed marketers to emphasize claims of high protein. More than 10 percent of recent yogurt launches globally used protein claims; in the U.S. a third of new launches were positioned this way. The trend is catching on, thanks to the booming interest in Greek and Greek-style yogurts, which have higher protein content. This in turn has led to the emergence of a sub-category, known as “brogurt”, targeting men, especially those interested in fitness. A new U.S. product, Powerful Yogurt, says it is the first Greek yogurt to target a male audience. It is sold in eight-ounce cups, each containing 25 grams of natural protein.
"Protein Claims Gaining In Yogurt Over ‘Probiotic’", Nutraceuticals World, December 03, 2013, © Rodman Media
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Romance Of Salt And Sugar Is No Longer A Secret Affair

December 3, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
The food industry’s love affair with salty-sweet snacks and treats continues unabated. There’s pecan pie potato chips from Pringles, salted caramel truffle ice cream from Häagen-Dazs, and Milano cookie slices topped with salted pretzel bits from Pepperidge Farms. On the local level, too, chefs, bakers, toffee makers and bartenders appreciate the extra special something that results from the marriage of salt and sugar. In Chicago, for example, one bakery serves a potato chip chocolate chip cookie. A restaurant offers fried Manchego cheese with red pepper sauce and wildflower honey as an appetizer. And another restaurant serves a cocktail made with tequila, cucumber, lemon and a Mexican herb syrup garnished with cumin salt.
Kate Silver, "Sweet meets salty in lots of Chicago treats", Chicago Sun-Times Media , December 03, 2013, © Sun-Times Media, LLC
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Alternating Days Of Low-Calorie And Regular Eating Has Health, Weight Loss Benefits

December 3, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
People who have tried intermittent food restriction – not quite strict feasting and then fasting – have found some health benefits in the practice, though most evidence so far is anecdotal. Intermittent restriction involves eating between 500 and 650 calories a day, every other day. On alternate days eating is normal. One 41-year-old man who has tried it for about a year – after a month-long “angry, grumpy” adjustment period – has lost 50 pounds, stopped taking medication for diabetes and no longer has stomach ulcers. A British study among three groups of overweight breast cancer patients found that two intermittent restriction groups lost twice as much weight as the daily calorie restriction group.
Shirley S. Wang, "Short Fasts for Weight Loss vs. Traditional Diets", The Wall Street Journal, December 03, 2013, © Dow Jones & Company, Inc
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Study Demonstrates How Low Vitamin D Levels Damage The Brain

December 2, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
A new British study shows that vitamin D, which is important for bone health, is also important for the health of other tissues and organs, including the brain. Middle-aged rats fed a diet low in vitamin D for several months developed free radical damage to the brain, and many different brain proteins were damaged as identified by redox proteomics. The rats also showed a significant decrease in cognitive performance on tests of learning and memory. The researchers advised people whose vitamin D levels are low to eat foods rich in vitamin D, take vitamin D supplements, or get at least 10-15 minutes of sun exposure each day.
Jeriel T.R. Keeneya et al., "Dietary vitamin D deficiency in rats from middle to old age leads to elevated tyrosine nitration and proteomics changes in levels of key proteins in brain: Implications for low vitamin D-dependent age-related cognitive decline", Free Radical Biology and Medicine, December 02, 2013, © Elsevier Inc.
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Key Trends That Will Dominate The Food And Beverage World Of 2014

November 21, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Supermarket Guru Phil Lempert predicts that ten trends will dominate the food and beverage world in 2014.The underlying current of the trends is the ever-changing relationship of health-conscious consumers with merchants, brands and food generally. At the top of the trend list is the emergence of the “IndieWoman”: a “major food influencer”. There are 31 million of them and they spend $50 billion a year on food and beverages. They are aged 27 and older, live alone, have no kids, are active socially, concerned about career growth and love to shop. Other trends focus on healthy snacking, loyalty to brands involved in social causes, reliance on smartphones when grocery shopping, etc.
"Supermarket Guru Predicts Social Shopping, Healthy Snacking And Millennials Will Shape Consumer Trends In The New Year", News release, ConAgra Foods, November 21, 2013, © ConAgra Foods, Inc
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Canadians Are Blurring The Concept Of Dessert

November 20, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
A survey by Technomic finds that Canadians are expanding their ideas about what constitutes dessert. Cake and cookies are the classics, but added to the list now are such nontraditional desserts as coffee, “adult” beverages, waffles and pancakes. In addition, Canadians are eating dessert-type foods as snacks and meal replacements, not just as after-dinner treats. To get the most profit from this trend, foodservice operators need to  "promote greater variety in terms of affordability, flavor uniqueness and portion size in order to meet a wider range of consumer expectations and preferences".
"Canadian Consumers are Expanding their Definition of Dessert, Finds New Technomic Study", Technomic, November 20, 2013, © Technomic, Inc.
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Natural – i.e., Grain Free – Pet Food Products Are Driving The Market

November 20, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
American pet owners are buying into the idea that the healthiest pet foods are more “natural”: high in protein and contain few or no grains, according to research by GfK, and they are willing to pay a 45 percent price premium for the products. It’s a trend that pet foods companies are paying close attention to, because feeding Fluffy and Rover is a multi-billion dollar business. Grain-free pet foods totaled $1.7 billion in sales over the past year; about a third of all new pet items introduced each month are grain-free. The number of grain-free pet products has grown 33 percent, to over 3,500 on shelves today, about 2,300 for dogs, versus roughly 1,200 for cats.
"Grain-Free Pet Food Sales Grew 28% Year over Year in US Pet Outlets – GfK Data", News release, GfK Data, November 20, 2013, © GfK Data
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Reduce The Risk Of Dementia By Eating More Fat And Protein, Much Less Grain

November 18, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
The basic premise of author David Perlmutter’s new book is that all brain disease – dementia, depression, epilepsy, headaches, etc. – is rooted in the diet, especially in carbohydrates like grains. “Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth About Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar” advocates a return to a primordial diet based on fat and protein. Fat should constitute about 75 percent of the diet, he says,  followed by 20 percent protein, then five percent carbs. There is some scientific basis for Perlmutter’s argument: a recent study found that elderly people who ate a high-carb diet were three times more likely to develop mild cognitive impairment. People whose diet was highest in fats found in nuts and healthy oils were 42 percent less likely to be cognitively impaired.
Anna Hodgekiss, "'Carbohydrates rot the brain': Neurologist slams grains as 'silent brain killers' - and says we should be eating a high-fat diet", Daily Mail, November 18, 2013, © Associated Newspapers Ltd
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