We use our own and third-party cookies to optimize your experience on this site, including to maintain user sessions. Without these cookies our site will not function well. If you continue browsing our site we take that to mean that you understand and accept how we use the cookies. If you wish to decline our cookies we will redirect you to Google.
Already have an account? Sign in.

 Remember Me | Forgot Your Password?
<<20212223242526272829>> Total results:3806 References Per Page:

Consumers Should Be Careful About Eating Seafood, But Should Not Ignore Its Health Benefits

July 17, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Consumers should be concerned about whether the seafood they eat is safe, but nutritionists say the health value of seafood far outweighs the risks. Eating two 3- to 5-ounce servings a week of fish such as salmon, oysters and rainbow trout provide an average of 250 mg/day of omega-3 fatty acids, which have been associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular disease. A professor at the University of Southern California said consumers can safely eat 12 ounces of a variety of cooked seafood a week, so long as they heed local seafood advisories “and limit their intake of large, predatory fish like shark”.
Roger Clemens, "Seafood Still Considered a Good Source of Nutrients but Consumers Confused On Safety", News release, panel discussion at the 2013 Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) Annual Meeting & Food Expo, July 17, 2013, © Institute of Food Technologists
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Advice & Policy
Bodily Needs
Ingredients
Nutrition
Meat, Fish & Savory
Safety
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Probiotic Strain Of E. Coli Inhibits Salmonella Replication In The Gut

July 17, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
U.S. researchers have determined that a probiotic strain of E. coli used to treat irritable bowel syndrome actually inhibits salmonella colonization in the gut, reducing the risk of bacterial infections. The probiotic bacterium competes with salmonella for iron, an essential nutrient found in  the gut that salmonella needs to replicate at high levels. Salmonella counts in the gut drop significantly when the E. coli strain Nissle 1917is administered to patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome. Researchers hope that by understanding how pathogens get nutrients, it will be easier to find ways to eradicate them.
Elisa Deriu et al., "Probiotic Bacteria Reduce Salmonella Typhimurium Intestinal Colonization by Competing for Iron", Cell Host & Microbe, July 17, 2013, © Elsevier Inc.
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Advice & Policy
Bodily Needs
Nutrition
Safety
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Tongue-Twister Carbohydrate Has Numerous Health, Food Benefits

July 16, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
The short-chain fructooligosaccharide (scFOS) is finally getting recognition in the world of nutrition, food technologists say. Though not yet a household word, a scFOS is a  low-calorie, non-digestible carbohydrate that can be used to improve texture, enhance flavor and lower the amount of sugar in food products because it provides about 30 to 50 percent of the sweetness of regular sugar. In addition, it aids the immune system, improves bone health and balances good bacteria in the digestive tract. It is naturally found in chicory, onions, asparagus, wheat, tomatoes and other fruits, vegetables and grains. 
Phillip Allsopp, "What Are Fructooliogosaccharides and How Do They Provide Digestive, Immunity and Bone Health Benefits?", News release, presentation at the 2013 Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) Annual Meeting & Expo, July 16, 2013, © Institute of Food Technologists
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Bodily Needs
Ingredients
Nutrition
Sugars & Sweeteners
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe
Ireland

Food Trend Spotter: Kitchens of Africa – Bringing African Flavors To America

July 16, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
At the Fancy Food Show in New York earlier this month that we attended we looked at range of emerging themes, one of which was the rise of novel flavors. Suppliers continue to experiment with more exotic and more vibrant tastes – often spicier and hotter (especially with Mexican and southern flavors) but also with growing acceptance of ethnic influences from farther afield, notably Indian and Thai flavors.
 
One new departure is Kitchens of Africa, established in 2012, which appeared at the show. The company is based in Raleigh, North Carolina, but its ‘roots extend all the way to The Gambia, a tiny country in the western part of Africa.’The company aims to develop ‘a line of flavorful African-inspired convenience foods’ and currently has two sauces, Maffé and Yassa. 
 
Maffé is a peanut simmer sauce that is ‘slightly sweet, spicy and tangy’ – Kitche
ns of Africa’s website claims the sauce ‘might remind you of Thai food, 
but in a more 

delicious way’. Yassa is an onion simmer sauce that ‘captures the tropical flav
ors of Africa with big, bright citrus notes’. Both sauces are available online at $14 for two 12oz jars.
Kitchens of Africa also offers an African jerk paste (marinade) that has ‘many exotic spices to capture the essence and complexity of true African-style Jerk.’ The paste comes in three levels of spiciness: mild, spicy and fiery. The price of the paste is not provided at the company’s site.
 
Comments about the company and its products are available at its Facebook page.
 
Business360 staff, "Fancy Food Show Review", Business360 Comments, July 16, 2013
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Marketplace
New Products
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Mood Disorders Can Be Improved With Vitamins, Minerals

July 16, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
A Canadian researcher who studied 97 adults diagnosed with mood disorders found that those who took more vitamins and minerals over three days showed significantly improved mental functioning. Bonnie Kaplan said vitamin and mineral supplements could be an alternative to increasing psychiatric medicines for relief of symptoms of anxiety and depression. Another researcher noted that 5-Hydroxytryptophan (5 HTP), vitamins B and D, as well as ginkgo biloba and omega 3 supplements have been known to enhance mood.
Bonnie Kaplan, "Vitamins and Minerals Can Boost Energy and Enhance Mood", News release, study presented at the 2013 Institute of Food Technologists Annual Meeting & Food Expo, July 16, 2013, © Institute of Food Technologists
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Bodily Needs
Ingredients
Marketplace
Research
Vitamins
Supplements
Vitamins
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Canada

Nuts – Especially Walnuts – Significantly Reduce Risks Of Cardiovascular And Cancer Death

July 16, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Researchers in Spain who compared the effect of a Mediterranean diet (with extra virgin olive oil and nuts) to a simply low-fat diet among 7,000 older people found that people who eat nuts, especially walnuts, tend to live longer. Those who followed the Mediterranean diet, and ate nuts at least three times a week, had a lower BMI and smaller waist, were less likely to smoke and more likely to be physically active. Nut eaters were less likely to have type 2 diabetes and hypertension, and had a 39 percent lower mortality risk (walnut eaters had a 45 percent lower risk). Those who ate three servings (one ounce per serving) a week of nuts reduced the chances of death due to cardiovascular disease by 55 percent and to cancer by 40 percent.
Marta Guasch-Ferré et al., "Frequency of nut consumption and mortality risk in the PREDIMED nutrition intervention trial", BMC Medicine, July 16, 2013, © Guasch-Ferré et al.
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Bodily Needs
Ingredients
Nutrition
Fruit, Vegetables & Nuts
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Spain

Scientific Evidence That Cranberries Do Inhibit The Bacterium Associated With UTIs

July 15, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Canadian researchers report that in lab experiments cranberry powder inhibits the swarming and swimming activity ability of bacterium frequently implicated in complicated urinary tract infections (UTIs). The study also shows that higher concentrations of cranberry powder reduce the bacteria's production of urease, an enzyme that contributes to the virulence of infections. The findings may point the way to developing protection against urinary tract and other infections. In another study, the scientists find that cranberry derivatives could someday be used to prevent bacterial colonization in medical devices such as catheters.
"How cranberries impact infection-causing bacteria", EurekAlert, July 15, 2013, © AAAS, the science society
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Ingredients
Marketplace
Innovation
Research
Fruit, Vegetables & Nuts
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Canada

Insufficient Vitamin D Often Leads To Functional Limitations Among The Elderly

July 15, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Elderly individuals who have low levels of vitamin D – available from sunlight or supplementation – are more likely to have mobility limitations and see their physical functioning decline over time, according to researchers in The Netherlands. Older people with these limitations often struggle with routine tasks such as dressing or climbing stairs, making them candidates for nursing home care and earlier mortality. Vitamin D deficiency can lead to a decline in bone density, muscle weakness, osteoporosis or broken bones. As many as 90 percent of older people are vitamin D deficient
E. Sohl et al., "Vitamin D Status Is Associated With Functional Limitations and Functional Decline in Older Individuals", The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, July 15, 2013, © The Endocrine Society
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Bodily Needs
Ingredients
Marketplace
Research
Diets
Nutrition
Functional Foods
Vitamins
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Netherlands

Locally-Raised Whole Chickens Are More Likely To Carry Dangerous Foodborne Pathogens

July 11, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Ninety percent of the whole chickens purchased at farmers markets in Pennsylvania during a recent study tested positive for dangerous Campylobacter bacteria and 28 percent carried Salmonella bacteria. During the same period, however, only 20 percent of raw, whole, organic chickens bought at grocery stores contained Campylobacter, and 28 percent tested positive for Salmonella. Only eight percent of nonorganic, conventionally processed chickens from grocery stores tested positive for Campylobacter, and half of those also had Salmonella. The researchers said their findings shed doubt on the widely held belief that locally bought poultry is safer.
Joshua Scheinberg et al., "A Microbiological Comparison of Poultry Products Obtained from Farmers' Markets and Supermarkets in Pennsylvania", Journal of Food Safety, July 11, 2013, © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Advice & Policy
Ingredients
Meat, Fish & Savory
Safety
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Manufacturers Working To Fulfill Growing Demand For Ethnic Foods, Even Among Non-Ethnics

July 8, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
As the buying power of Latino and Asian consumers expands, big food manufacturers are turning to an array of new marketing tactics – packaging innovation, fruit flavors, hotter spices, different textures and grains – to attract an ever more diverse audience, including white millennials. Sales have jumped 4.5 percent between 2010 to 2012 to $8.7 billion, and one researcher predicts ethnic food sales – especially Middle Eastern and Mediterranean foods – will grow by 20 percent through 2017 in grocery stores. A clear example: sales of a Mexican fruity soda in garish colors are through the roof, though sales of carbonated drinks are generally declining. The drinks, already popular among Hispanics, have caught on among non-Hispanics.
Stephanie Strom, "American Tastes Branch Out, and Food Makers Follow", The New York Times, July 08, 2013, © The New York Times Company
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Ingredients
Marketplace
New Formats
New Products
New Ways of Eating
Flavors & Colors
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Bread Consumption Declines In UK, With White Bread Dropping Fastest

July 5, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
In general, bread consumption in the UK is declining for the fast few years at around 2 percent each year, according to data from the Federal of Bakers. White bread remains the bestseller bread type in the country; however, it also recorded the biggest decline. FOB director Gordon Polson blames the industry’s promotion of wholemeal bread for the decline in sales of bread, saying marketers failed to tell consumers that “white bread is good for you too.” Not everything is lost, however, the industry just needs to push harder to promote consumer awareness of white bread and its nutritional properties, Polson added.
Kacey Culliney, "The white bread slump: ‘It’s maybe our fault in promoting wholemeal’, says Federation of Bakers", Bakery and Snacks, July 05, 2013, © William Reed Business Media SAS
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Ingredients
Natural & Organic
Whole Grains
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Benefits Of A Low-GI Diet Need To Be Better Communicated

July 1, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Although the science is not yet fully understood by the average consumer, the benefits of eating low glycemic index (GI) foods are beginning to gain wider acceptance. The European Union, for example, recently approved the health claim that fructose-containing foods lead to a lower rise in blood sugar – the basic definition of glycemic index – as long as they lower sucrose or glucose in the product by at least 30 percent. Meanwhile, nutrition experts are backing the use of improved graphics on food packages to get the lower GI message across to shoppers. “’Slow releasing energy’ is a message that people understand,” a food company exec says. “Blood glucose management is something that people are starting to buy into.”
Caroline Scott-Thomas, "‘Perfect storm of science’ for low-GI fruit ingredients, says Taura chief", Bakery and Snacks, July 01, 2013, © William Reed Business Media SAS
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Bodily Needs
Ingredients
Diets
Nutrition
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe

Coconut Spills Over The Water Category Into Other Products

June 21, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Market researcher Innova says 21 percent more products contained coconut or coconut flavor in 2012 than in 2011, an indication that coconut has spilled over into other categories besides water. That includes frozen novelties – e.g., Nestlé Dreyer’s non-dairy, non-fat pops available in banana and pineapple flavors – and sports drink mixes. To capture attention in a saturated market, sports drinks mixes containing potassium-rich coconut also offer some extras, like pulp and probiotics, as well as different formats and flavors. Coconut water, meanwhile, is being used in vodka cocktails, whipped toppings and smoothies for kids.
Monica Watrous, "Slideshow: Coconut water gets a refresh", Food Business News, June 21, 2013, © SOSLAND PUBLISHING CO
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Advice & Policy
Bodily Needs
Ingredients
Marketplace
New Products
Nutrition
Fruit, Vegetables & Nuts
Trend Research & Commentary
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Antidepressants + Stress + High-Fat Diet = Long-Term Weight Gain

June 19, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Taking antidepressants even for a short period of time can lead to significant weight gain when combined with stress and a high-fat diet, according to an Australian study in rats. The finding is significant because millions of prescriptions for antidepressants are written each year -- at the same time that obesity rates are climbing. For the study, male rats were treated with the antidepressant fluoxitine after induced stress. These animals had significantly higher weight gain than control animals. Researchers concluded that short-term exposure to stress and antidepressants – rather than a high-calorie, high-fat diet alone – leads to long-term body weight gain.
Suhyun Lee et al., "Relationship Between Short-Term Antidepressant Use, Stress, High-Fat Diet And Long-Term Weight Gain", News release, study presented at the Endocrine Society annual meeting, June 19, 2013, via Medical News Today, © MediLexicon International Ltd
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Bodily Needs
Ingredients
Marketplace
Research
Diets
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
Australia

New Convenience Foods Require Home Cooks To Do A Little Work

June 18, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Food companies have determined that many women, and increasingly more men, enjoy cooking dinner at home but often don’t have the time. They reluctantly turn to boxed or frozen convenience foods. But now companies are developing packaged meals – e.g., Kraft’s new Recipe Makers products – that require the cook to do a little of the work. In its consumer research, Kraft showed women versions of convenience foods that required adding either one or two sauces. The women preferred the two-sauce version because the added steps made the product feel more like homemade. A Kraft researcher said women wanted to spend at least 15 to 30 minutes peeling, chopping or doing other meal preparation "to have it count”.
Sarah Nassauer, "The Art of Almost Homemade", Wall Street Journal, June 18, 2013, © Dow Jones & Company, Inc
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Advice & Policy
Marketplace
New Formats
New Products
New Ways of Eating
Trend Research & Commentary
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Judge Punts GMO-“All Natural” Controversy To The FDA

June 18, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Can a food product containing genetically modified organisms be labeled “all natural”? A federal judge decided it wasn’t a question she could answer, so she put a lawsuit on hold until the FDA could come up with a definition of “natural”. The lawsuit was filed by a San Francisco resident who said Mission tortilla triangles should not be labeled all-natural because they contain GMOs in the form of corn or corn derivatives. The judge ordered that the litigation be stayed for six months and referred to the FDA to determine “whether products containing GMO or bioengineered ingredients may properly be labeled ‘natural’ or ‘all natural’.”
Elaine Watson , "Judge: ‘There is a gaping hole in the current regulatory landscape for ‘natural’ claims and GMOs’", Food Navigator, June 18, 2013, © William Reed Business Media SAS
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Advice & Policy
Regulation
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

NIH Launches Online Database Of Dietary Supplement Product Information

June 17, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
The U.S. National Institutes of Health launched the Dietary Supplement Label Database, an online database that lists product information including ingredients of about 17,000 dietary supplements. Aimed a researchers, health care providers and consumers, the database is linked to a mobile app, My Dietary Supplements, from the NIH Office of Dietary Supplements. Among the online database's features are Quick Search, Search for Dietary Ingredients, and Search for Specific Products. Taken regularly by about half of the U.S. adult population, dietary supplements are required by law to carry a Supplement Facts panel that lists its contents and other ingredients added.
"NIH launches Dietary Supplement Label Database", National Institutes of Health (NIH), June 17, 2013, © National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Domains
Bodily Needs
Nutrition
Regulation
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Fruit Flavors Dominate New Yogurt Product Launches Globally

June 14, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Research from Innova Market Insights finds a global trend toward fruit flavored yogurt, from more traditional strawberry and peach to more unusual flavors such as papaya, damson and coconut. Two-thirds of global yogurt product launches in the 12 months ending in March 2013 featured fruit flavors. New fruit flavored yogurt introductions accounted for 75 percent of the U.S. total and 70 percent of the total in Latin America. According to Innova, the development of new flavors for yogurt is driven by the need for differentiation, especially toward more upmarket and complex options, for example products with several ingredients or formulations from other sectors, such as desserts, bakery and confectionery.
"Fruity Flavours Favoured In New Yoghurt Formulations", Food Ingredients First, June 14, 2013, © CNS Media BV
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Ingredients
Marketplace
New Products
Cultures, enzymes, yeast
Dairy-based ingredients
Flavors & Colors
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom
Germany

Gluten-Free Food, Beverage Market Continues To Boom

June 13, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Though there are only 1.8 million people in the U.S. with extreme digestive sensitivity to gluten (celiac disease) – and 78 percent of those don’t know it – somehow the market for gluten-free food products hit $4.2 billion in 2012. According to Packaged Facts, the main reason for this phenomenon – a CAGR of 28 percent between 2008 and 2012 – is the perception among consumers that gluten-free products are healthier. The food industry has certainly responded to that perception. People looking for gluten-free foods and beverages are finding a huge diversity of products in the marketplace, and numerous new product introductions within the past year.
"Gorging on Gluten-free", Prepared Foods, June 13, 2013, © BNP Media
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Bodily Needs
Ingredients
Diets
Nutrition
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Burgeoning Senior Population Presents Significant Opportunities For The Food Industry

June 12, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Mintel analysts say food companies will have a lot of opportunities to satisfy the demand not only for healthy products for the growing senior population, but also the demand for easier-to-open packaging. "Of all the launches in 2012 there were actually only 0.6% that had specifically easy to open packaging,” a Mintel analyst said. The world’s population of seniors age 55 and over will grow by 144 million by 2015, according to Mintel, and this will create “massive opportunities” for companies in the food and beverage industries.
Nathan Gray , "Aging consumer market is 'a massive opportunity' for the industry: Mintel", Nutraingredients, June 12, 2013, © William Reed Business Media SAS
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Advice & Policy
Bodily Needs
Marketplace
Research
Consumers
Trend Research & Commentary
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe
United Kingdom

Small Is Delicious When It Comes To Cakes In The U.K.

June 11, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Cake lovers in Great Britain have latched onto a growing trend: small cakes, according to market researcher Mintel. Sales of small cakes have surpassed those of larger creations, surging 19 percent in the last two years. Small cakes – i.e., doughnuts, cake pops, muffins, macaroons, etc. – have a market value of £492 million ($772 million). Meanwhile, sales of large cakes have dipped three percent since 2011. The trend toward small cakes began with the surge in cupcake popularity in the 2000s and is continuing with the emergence of the “cronut” and possibly the éclair (in the U.K. at least). Two factors are driving the trend, according to experts: low price and the perception that small is healthier, or maybe less unhealthy.
Sarah Rainey, "Bite-sized treats taste all the sweeter", The Telegraph, June 11, 2013, © Telegraph Media Group Limited
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Bodily Needs
Ingredients
Marketplace
New Products
Consumers
Cereals & Bakery
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Preschoolers From Higher-Income Families More Likely To Consume Junk Food

June 8, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Preschoolers from higher-income families who watch a lot of TV packed with food ads are more likely to indulge in junk food, and are therefore at greater risk of obesity, according to a new U.S. study. The findings come from interviews with more than 100 parents about home characteristics, including time spent viewing commercial TV, prerecorded commercial-free TV, and other media without food ads. Interviews with preschoolers were also conducted to see what they thought was a healthy meal. Interviewees were grouped into food-secure families (higher income) or food-insecure families (lower income). Food-secure families who could afford to give in to cravings when watching food ads were more likely to eat junk food, and their children had “distorted” ideas on what a healthy meal is.
Kristen Harrison and Mericarmen Peralta, "Parents With Heavy TV Viewing More Likely to Feed Children Junk Food", News release, study presented at the annual International Communication Association conference, June 08, 2013, © Harrison et al.
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Bodily Needs
Ingredients
Consumers
Diets
Junk
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Top Natural/Organic Food Trends Include Fortified Waters, Faux Meats, Nut Butters

June 7, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
A Colorado consulting firm that analyzed data gleaned from food industry experts, trade shows and publications has compiled a list of the top ten natural food trends for 2013. According to Sterling-Rice Group, the hot trends in natural and organic foods include: wholesome foods for men (high-protein Powerful Yogurt and Tanka Bars); products that promise clarity, calmness and inner peace; salad greens beyond the bowl (teas, snacks and sweets); upscale, fortified water; textured beverages (chewy chia juice); fancy faux meats; allergen-free alternative proteins (pea protein); indulgent nut butters (fruit, chocolate, espresso and seeds and spices); South American superfoods (Brazilian acerola cherries); and nutritional desserts (detoxifying gingersnaps and high-protein frozen yogurt).
Monica Watrous, "Chewy juices and mock meats top natural food trends", Food Business News, June 07, 2013, © SOSLAND PUBLISHING CO
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Advice & Policy
Ingredients
Marketplace
New Products
New Ways of Eating
Natural & Organic
Trend Research & Commentary
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Study Finds No Reason To Worry About Consuming Vegetable Oils

June 7, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
A new U.S. study debunks claims that daily intake of linoleic acid-rich vegetable oils – e.g., soy, corn and canola – might be harmful to a person’s health. The researchers reviewed 15 clinical trials that studied nearly 500 adults as they consumed various forms of fats, including vegetable oils. They found no link between vegetable oil consumption and indicators of inflammation in the blood that are often associated with heart disease, cancer, asthma and arthritis. Earlier animal studies had found that a diet rich in linoleic acid (LA) boosts inflammation, but humans do not respond to LA in the same way.
Guy H. Johnson & Kevin Fritsche, "Effect of Dietary Linoleic Acid on Markers of Inflammation in Healthy Persons: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials", Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, June 07, 2013, © Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Ingredients
Marketplace
Research
Fats & Oils
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Companies Overcome Technical Challenges To Develop Avocado Powder

June 5, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Two New Zealand firms have partnered to develop an avocado powder for companies that make food products (guacamole), cosmetics (facial masks) and nutraceutical supplements and capsules. The powder produced by spray dryer FoodWaikato and Avocado Oil New Zealand will be sold under the brand name Avopure in Australia, the U.S., Japan and China. The companies had to overcome some tricky technical challenges to make the powder: avocadoes are fibrous, highly viscous, and oxidize rapidly when exposed to air.
Sophie Langley, "“Pure” avocado powder on the way", Australia Food News, June 05, 2013, © Australia Food News
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Ingredients
Marketplace
Innovation
New Products
Fruit, Vegetables & Nuts
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
Australia
New Zealand

From Ancient Denmark Comes A New Kind Of Hybrid Pastry: The Ebelskiver

June 5, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
The dessert industry is in the midst of a hybridization trend: think “cronuts” and “taco waffles”. Or pie crust filled with cake, crispy waffles dressed up as cookies, etc. One of the latest examples of the trend is a dessert from Denmark known as ebelskiver, a cross between a cake (or a pancake) and a popover, that has been around since Viking days. Judging from the proliferation of ebelskiver pans on the market, the dessert is catching on. The pans have seven half-circle indentations or wells for batter that can be cooked – plain or filled – on the stove top burner. Recipes are available from all over the world, including raspberry blintz, savory pa jeon (Korean green onion), and tiramisu puffs (an Italian variation) made with ricotta and rum.
Ruth Taber , "New twists on treats: Creative bakers make hybrids of popular desserts", El Paso Times, June 05, 2013, © El Paso Times and MediaNews Group
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Ingredients
Marketplace
Innovation
New Products
Cereals & Bakery
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe
Denmark

Cereals Have Added More Fiber, Lost Some Sugar And Sodium, USDA Study Shows

June 4, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
In 2011, ready-to-eat cereals in the United States have 32 percent more fiber content, while their sugar and sodium levels have declined 10 percent and 14 percent, respectively, compared with levels in 2005, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture research. Results of the study, published in the June 2013 issue of Procedia Food Science journal, highlight cereal manufacturers' efforts to improve the "nutrient profile" of their products, according to Kevin Miller, a contributing author to the USDA study and senior nutrition scientist at Kellogg Co.
"New USDA Study Finds More Fiber, Less Sugar & Sodium in Breakfast Cereals", Kellogg Company, June 04, 2013, © Kellogg Company
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Ingredients
Cereals & Bakery
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Entrepreneurs Apply 3D Printing Technology To The Creation Of Cake Toppers

June 4, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
An enterprising young British couple who lacked an oven for baking has nevertheless launched a baking business using a printer that creates edible 3D sugar statues that can be eaten on their own or used as cake and pastry decorations. The couple, former architectural students, applied a 3D printing technology used by architects to create physical models of buildings prior to construction. Their first creation was a tiny cupcake topper that spelled a friend's name. The couple, which has partnered with celebrity chef Duff Goldman to create a large wedding cake embellished with their confections, firmly believes that the technology has opened up “a whole new set of possibilities” for the baking industry.
Sadie Whitelocks, "Is this the future of baking? The 3D printer that creates incredible confectionery from scratch", Daily Mail Online, June 04, 2013, © Associated Newspapers Ltd
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Ingredients
Marketplace
Innovation
New Products
Cereals & Bakery
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Taiyo Receives Health Canada's Nod For Its Sunfiber Ingredient

June 4, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Health Canada approved Taiyo's ingredient, Sunfiber, for use as a dietary fiber source. The agency based its decision on results of clinical studies highlighting the safety and benefits of using Sunfiber as a food ingredient, including the more than 20 percent reduction in postprandial blood glucose levels. Sunfiber is a soluble, transparent, and tasteless dietary fiber the company claims is low in viscosity and improves stability of beverages at different pH levels. Taiyo also says it is resistant to heat, acid, and digestive enzymes. Other benefits claimed by the company include enhancement of mineral absorption and protein use.
"Health Canada approves Sunfiber® as a dietary fiber source", Sunfiber, June 04, 2013, © Taiyo International
Domains
Ingredients
Carbohydrates & Fibers (sugar, starches)
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Canada

Eating Ready-To-Eat Cereal For Breakfast Is Healthier For Adults Aged 19 To 50

June 3, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
U.S. scientists who analyzed data from a national nutrition survey involving more than 14,000 adults ages 19 to 70 found that eating breakfast, particularly a ready-to-eat (RTE) cereal breakfast, “may contribute to healthy aging through reduced risk of chronic disease”. The study found that RTE cereal – compared to “other breakfasts” or no breakfast – was associated with lower body weight, lower body mass index, reduced abdominal fat and fewer risk factors for metabolic syndrome among adults 19 to 50. The study, however, found that neither RTE cereal breakfasts or “other breakfasts” reduced the risk of being overweight or obese among those aged 51 to 70.
C.R. McGill et al., "Breakfast And Ready-To-Eat Cereal Consumption Are Associated With Improved Markers Of Cardiometabolic Health In Adults: Results From The National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey 2001 - 2008", The Journal of Aging Research and Clinical Practice, June 03, 2013, © The Journal of Aging Research & Clinical Practice
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Bodily Needs
Marketplace
Research
Diets
Nutrition
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

College Athletes Are Heavy Users Of Energy Drinks, Supplements, Prescribed Medications

June 1, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
A survey conducted in 2010-2011 among college students who participated in athletics found that “the vast majority” were using energy drinks, dietary supplements, and prescription medications to enhance athletic performance. The findings may spark renewed interest in the use of energy drinks and other dietary supplements targeted at student athletes. Energy drinks had the highest prevalence (80.1 percent), followed by dietary supplements (64.1 percent) and prescription medications (53.3 percent). Use was most prevalent amongst intercollegiate athletes (89.4 percent). The researchers acknowledged that most ingredients are safe, “but as the products are not regulated as pharmaceuticals, there is a potential for toxicity from either a new ingredient or contamination”.
Hoyte C.O. et al., "The use of energy drinks, dietary supplements, and prescription medications by United States college students to enhance athletic performance.", National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, June 01, 2013, © National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Bodily Needs
Ingredients
Marketplace
Research
Nutrition
Functional Foods
Supplements
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Coconut Water Is The Star Of The Beverage Industry

May 31, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Use of electrolyte-rich coconut water is growing globally, according to researcher Mintel, even though other electrolyte beverages like sports recovery drinks and vitamin-enhanced waters are well-established. Product introductions have grown 540 percent worldwide since 2008, dominated by activity in North America (35 percent, up 17 percent) and Europe (34 percent, up 13 percent). Product launches in Latin America dropped 61 percent, however. Mintel says the growth has been helped by celebrity endorsements and beverage company investments. Low/no/reduced fat coconut water is the most popular product claim, accounting for 47 percent of all coconut water claims in 2012.
"Tropical storm in the food and drink market: launches of coconut water quintuple over the past five years", Mintel, May 31, 2013, © Mintel
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Advice & Policy
Ingredients
Fruit, Vegetables & Nuts
Functional Foods
Natural & Organic
Trend Research & Commentary
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Reducing Bacterial Contamination Of Poultry Products Should Begin On The Farm

May 31, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
A U.S. study that linked foodborne pathogens on poultry farms and at processing plants suggests that reducing harmful bacteria on the farm may be the most important step to keeping them out of the food supply. Current efforts to prevent food contamination are focused on the processing plant phase. Scientists traced salmonella and campylobacter bacteria – which together cause 1.9 million foodborne illnesses in the U.S. annually – from the processing plants back to the source farma 96 and 71 percent of the time, respectively. Measures to reduce salmonella on the farm include vaccination of breeder hens, “competitive exclusion” products and using acidified water during feed withdrawal.
R. D. Berghaus et al., "Enumeration of Salmonella and Campylobacter in Environmental Farm Samples and Processing Plant Carcass Rinses from Commercial Broiler Chicken Flocks", Applied and Environmental Microbiology, May 31, 2013, © American Society for Microbiology
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Advice & Policy
Ingredients
Meat, Fish & Savory
Safety
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Researchers Find That Sucralose Affects Glucose And Insulin Response

May 29, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
U.S. researchers have found evidence that sucralose, the main ingredient of the sweetener  Splenda, does not pass through the body without effect. Obese participants without diabetes drank water followed by glucose, then sucralose followed by glucose. When they drank sucralose, their blood sugar peaked at a higher level than when they drank only water before consuming glucose. Sucralose therefore affects the glucose and insulin response to glucose ingestion, though the researchers acknowledged they do not yet understand the mechanism responsible for the response. Further studies are needed to determine the long-term metabolic impact of sucralose consumption.
M. Y. Pepino et al., "Sucralose Affects Glycemic and Hormonal Responses to an Oral Glucose Load", Diabetes Care, May 29, 2013, © American Diabetes Association
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Ingredients
Sugars & Sweeteners
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Swedish Research Highlights Health Benefits Of A Scandinavian Diet

May 29, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
A “Nordic” diet rich in berries, root vegetables, legumes, whole grains, cabbage, rapeseed (canola) oil, nuts, poultry and fish reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, a Swedish study has found. Participants in the research followed either the Nordic diet or a diet that included butter, fewer berries and vegetables, and more red meat and white bread. The Nordic diet lowered cholesterol levels and inflammation associated with pre-diabetes, researchers reported.
M. Uusitupa et al., "Effects of an isocaloric healthy Nordic diet on insulin sensitivity, lipid profile and inflammation markers in metabolic syndrome - a randomized study", Journal of Internal Medicine, May 29, 2013, © Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Marketplace
Research
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Sweden

Humans Need To Bring Back Phytonutrients Into Produce They Eat

May 25, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
The produce that humans eat today has relatively low levels of phytonutrients, according to researchers who have used new technology to compare phytonutrient content of wild plants with agricultural products in supermarkets in the past 15 years. Phytonutrients are potentially helpful in the fight against cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and dementia. This loss of phytonutrients from produce has led some researchers to wonder if people who foraged for wild foods were healthier than today's humans. Although ancient humans, who died mainly from injury and infections, did not live nearly as long as today's humans, they were also much less prone to dying from degenerative diseases. European settlers' role in the transformation of the multi-variety Native American corn into today's yellow sweet corn highlights how farming practices played a role in the loss of phytonutrients from produce.
JO ROBINSON, "Breeding the Nutrition Out of Our Food", The New York Times, May 25, 2013, © The New York Times Company
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Bodily Needs
Consumers
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe

Bid To Cut Back Federal Support For Sugar Industry Turns Sour

May 23, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
The U.S. Senate has rejected a 10-year push by major candy and soft drink companies to get rid of federal support for the sugar industry that keeps domestic sugar prices artificially high. The defeated amendment by Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) would have been attached to a multiyear farm bill pending on the Senate floor. Because the legislation was defeated, the government will continue to provide operating loans, import restrictions and market intervention that guarantee a minimum price for sugar, “a sweet deal for sugar growers and a bad deal for consumers," Shaheen said before the vote.
Alexandra Wexler and Jerry A. Dicolo, "Senate Rejects Bid to Stem Sugar Aid", The Wall Street Journal, May 23, 2013, © Dow Jones & Company, Inc
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Advice & Policy
Ingredients
Sugars & Sweeteners
Regulation
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Most Kids, Teens Ignore Fast-Food Restaurant Calorie Info When Buying Meals

May 22, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
A U.S. study based on a survey of 721 kids and teens ages 9 to 18 found that only four out of ten pay attention to calorie information posted on chain or fast-food restaurant menus. Girls were about 80 percent more likely than boys to say they checked calorie content when choosing food items. Kids who said they ate at a fast food/chain restaurant twice a week were half as likely to report using calorie information. One encouraging sign was that overweight youths were much more likely to pay attention to calorie information when choosing foods. “This may have potential to lead to improved food choices as a way to manage weight,” researchers said.
H. Wethington et al., "Use of calorie information at fast food and chain restaurants among US youth aged 9–18 years, 2010", Journal of Public Health, May 22, 2013, © Faculty of Public Health of the Royal Colleges of Physicians of the United Kingdom
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Bodily Needs
Marketplace
Research
Consumers
Diets
Nutrition
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Food Industry Continues To Promote Unhealthy Sugar Consumption, Cardiologist Says

May 21, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
A British cardiologist has accused the food industry of pursuing public relations “strategies” that minimize the role of added sugar as a significant cause of diseases and disorders associated with an unhealthy diet. Dr. Aseem Malhotra has urged U.K. health authorities to "act swiftly" to tackle the crisis. Despite warnings from the American Heart Association, and several studies linking sugar consumption with increasing rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes, the food industry continues to promote sugar-laden products, while making it difficult for consumers to tell accurately how much added sugar they are consuming in those products. Food companies also promote sugary sports drinks as essential for athletic performance, but the drinks are consumed in large quantities by non-athletes.
E. Herrett et al., "Completeness and diagnostic validity of recording acute myocardial infarction events in primary care, hospital care, disease registry, and national mortality records: cohort study", BMJ, May 21, 2013, © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Advice & Policy
Ingredients
Sugars & Sweeteners
Regulation
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Human Intestinal Bacteria Shown To Remove E. Coli Toxins In Mouse Study

May 20, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
U.S. researchers have shown in mice that normal human intestinal bacteria can prevent the accumulation of toxins caused by the presence of the dangerous foodborne pathogen E. coli. The bacteria has been responsible for several recent outbreaks of disease that led to hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a form of acute renal disease that can result in death or permanent disability. For the study, mice pre-colonized with a mixture of non-pathenogenic bacteria that occur naturally in the human gut remained completely healthy after E. Coli toxins were introduced. The control group, however, had high levels of toxins and all developed kidney disease within a week of infection.
Kathryn Eaton et al., "Intestinal Bacteria Protect Against E Coli O157:H7", News release, presentation at the general meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, May 20, 2013, © American Society for Microbiology
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Advice & Policy
Safety
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Sugar Is Not The Only Villain In The National Obesity Problem

May 20, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Although the sugar consumed by Americans in soft drinks and processed foods contributes to the obesity epidemic, it is not the only culprit. In fact, the increase in the daily calorie intake over the last five decades is tied to other factors. More than half of the added calories over the years have come from fats and oils, and from flour and cereal. Other factors contributing to the obesity problem: demographic changes (i.e., fewer home-cooked meals, more dining out); increased portion sizes at restaurants; increased caloric content of bagels, muffins, premium cups of coffee, yogurt, etc.; and even evolution, “which has programmed us to store calories when food is plentiful and, when food is scarce, to reduce calories we expend.”
Jane E. Brody, "Many Fronts in Fighting Obesity", The New York Times, May 20, 2013, © The New York Times Company
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Advice & Policy
Bodily Needs
Marketplace
Research
Diets
Nutrition
Trend Research & Commentary
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

European Scientists Develop A Way To Process Poultry Leftovers Into Protein Additives

May 20, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
A European Union research project has developed a process involving enzymes that converts industrial poultry waste – leftover bone, meat trimmings, etc. – into proteins rich in nutritionally useful amino acids. Known as “functional animal protein hydrolysates,” they can be used as supplements for sports diets, to help build up muscle tissue, and as additives in processed food. Some of their properties – prebiotic, anti-microbiotic, antioxidant and hypotensive – have been demonstrated in vitro. The technology is being tested by Belgian food company PROLIVER to enhance the nutritional quality of its protein hydrolysates, sold in dietary, health and sports food supplements.
Arnaldo Dossena, "Making Ice Cream More Nutritious With Meat Leftovers", News release, PROSPARE project (European Union), May 20, 2013, © PROSPARE Project
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Ingredients
Cultures, enzymes, yeast
Proteins, non-dairy
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Belgium

Sugary Beverages Linked To Higher Risk Of Kidney Stones

May 16, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
For years, doctors have advised kidney stone patients to drink more fluids to prevent a recurrence. But new research shows that not all fluids offer that benefit. Consumption of sugar-sweetened soda and punch is linked to a higher incidence of kidney stones, according to data compiled from three ongoing studies involving more than 194,000 participants over eight years. Those who consumed one or more sugar-sweetened cola servings a day had a 23 percent higher risk of developing kidney stones, compared to those who drank less than one a week. Some beverages – coffee, tea and orange juice – were associated with a lower risk of stone formation.
Engredea News & Analysis , "Sugary drinks may up kidney stone risk", Newhope 360, May 16, 2013, © Penton Media Inc
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Ingredients
Sugars & Sweeteners
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

GLG Life Tech Partners With China National Cereals, Oils, And Foodstuff To Promote Stevia Products In China

May 15, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
GLG Life Tech Corp. entered into a strategic collaboration deal with China National Cereals, Oils, and Foodstuff Corp. for the Chinese market. A number of months in the making, the collaboration will focus on developing products that will help promote health food and beverage products and improving the health and welfare of consumers in China. Also, the partners announced that their collaborative efforts will focus on healthier food and beverage products, technology, and investments. GLG said it expects the official letter of intent to be signed the coming weeks, detailing the areas of partnership. China is one of the countries with the largest populations of people with diabetes, with about 90 million diagnosed with the disease and approximately 200 million classified as obese.
"GLG Life Tech Corporation Announces Planned Collaboration With China National Cereals, Oils, and Foodstuff Corporation ("COFCO")", GLOBE NEWSWIRE , May 15, 2013, © GlobeNewswire, Inc
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Ingredients
Natural & Organic
Sugars & Sweeteners
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
China

Otis Spunkmeyer’s New Whole Grain Cookie Dough Meets USDA School Lunch Guidelines

May 14, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
The fundraising division of the Otis Spunkmeyer baking company is offering a reformulated – healthier and sweeter – “guilt-free” version of its frozen chocolate chip cookie dough to organizations that sell baked goods to raise money. The dough now uses more whole grain flour, along with “decadent’ Barry Callebaut chocolate chips. A  cookie made with the dough has 30 percent fewer calories from fat, less than 10 percent calories from saturated fat and less than 30 percent sugar. The company claims that the whole grain formula meets new USDA school nutritional requirements.
"Otis Spunkmeyer® Fundraising Re-Introduces Reduced Fat Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough, Now Made with More Whole Grain", PRWeb, May 14, 2013, © Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Ingredients
Cereals & Bakery
Whole Grains
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Educating Consumers About The Consequences Of Restaurant Meals Could Curb Obesity

May 9, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Authors of a recent U.S. study suggest that state and local governments could help curb the nation’s obesity epidemic by requiring restaurant menus to provide not only calorie counts but also the amount of exercise necessary to burn off those calories. The researchers examined studies on calorie labeling and regulatory options available to local governments. The studies showed that when presented with calorie counts and other menu information, consumers were half as likely to order a high calorie meal. Researchers also recommended replacing menu items like French fries with alternatives like apple slices.
Sara N. Bleich et al., "Improving Obesity Prevention at the Local Level — Emerging Opportunities", New England Journal of Medicine, May 09, 2013, © Massachusetts Medical Society
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Advice & Policy
Bodily Needs
Nutrition
Regulation
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Intense Interval Training Works Wonders On The Body – In Seven Minutes

May 9, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
An article by Canadian researchers in a health fitness journal describes an intense – but very short, fairly easy and scientifically sound – exercise program that produces beneficial molecular changes in muscles comparable to those induced by hours of running or biking. The 12 familiar exercises – pushups, lunges, jumping jacks, squats, etc. – are performed in intervals: 30 seconds of intense exercise followed by a 10-second rest, followed by 30 seconds of exercise, and so on. Exercises alternately target upper body and lower body muscles, allowing worked muscles to recuperate. “The upside is, after seven minutes, you’re done,” says New York Times blogger Gretchen Reynolds.
Gretchen Reynolds, "The Scientific 7-Minute Workout", The New York Times, May 09, 2013, © The New York Times Company
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Bodily Needs
Marketplace
Research
Consumers
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Canada

New York City Is A Regulatory Briar Patch For Food Truck Entrepreneurs

May 7, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
NPR podcaster and blogger Adam Davidson describes how bureaucratic red tape, conflicting city rules and regulations, and expensive enforcement penalties have sent the food-truck business in New York City into a tailspin. Though many entrepreneurs have attempted to sell upscale fare from their trucks, the ratio of food trucks selling overboiled hot dogs and overpriced sodas to trucks selling upscale lunch foods is now 25 to one. In the first place, it is very difficult to leap all the bureaucratic hurdles required to start a food-truck business. And, once in business, operators are hampered by a slew of (often conflicting) regulations issued by the departments of Health, Sanitation, Transportation and Consumer Affairs, all enforced, with varying consistency, by the New York Police Department.
Adam Davidson, "The Food-Truck Business Stinks", The New York Times, May 07, 2013, © The New York Times Company
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Advice & Policy
Marketplace
New Formats
New Ways of Eating
Regulation
Trend Research & Commentary
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

New Foodservice Company Tackles A Tough Problem: Providing Healthy – And Tasty – School Meals

May 4, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Nearly everyone – school administrators, Michele Obama, nutritionists, the U.S. Congress, etc. – agrees that school lunches need to be healthier. Kids themselves are apparently okay with healthy as long as it’s also tasty, and that has been a problem. Entering this $16 billion market is a new school meals company – Revolution Foods – determined to provide healthy choices using locally produced foods that kids would eat because they taste good. The company develops its meals with the help of kids, using tastings, focus groups and constant feedback. Revolution, which is not yet profitable, recently won a contract to provide meals to 114 schools in San Francisco, and the number of children choosing to eat the company’s offerings leaped 12 percent.
"A new company is trying to make school meals healthier", The Economist, May 04, 2013, © The Economist Newspaper Limited
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Advice & Policy
Bodily Needs
Consumers
Diets
Nutrition
Trend Research & Commentary
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Low-Carb Pita Breads And Lavash From New England Bakery

May 4, 2013: 12:00 AM EST
Massachusetts pita bread and lavash specialist Joseph’s Bakery is now offering low-carb versions of its bread and other baked goods. Besides wraps, lavash and pitas, the bakery produces sweet muffins, pizza dough, pancakes and tortillas. Shoppers can select classic white pita bread or low-carb white pita bread, or lite soy protein pita bread, flax bread, oat bran, and whole wheat pita bread. The company offers seven varieties of tortilla, from traditional white to a flax/reduced carb tortilla. The certified organic bakery uses 100 percent whole wheat, multigrains, flax (with omega 3 fatty acids), oat bran, and plant sterols. It also offers gluten-free products that are low in carbohydrates.
"Lavash, Low-Carb Bread, Pita Bread, and More: Joseph's Bakery Offers Healthy Baked Goods That Don't Sacrifice Flavor", News release, Joseph's Bakery, May 04, 2013, © Joseph's Bakery
Domains
FOOD TRENDS
Ingredients
Marketplace
Innovation
New Products
Cereals & Bakery
Whole Grains
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America
<<20212223242526272829>> Total results:3806 References Per Page:
>> <<
Developed by Yuri Ingultsov Software Lab.