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<<68697071727374757677>> Total results:3808 References Per Page:

DASH Diet Slashes Heart Failure Rate in Women

May 11, 2009: 06:04 AM EST
The DASH diet appears to lower the risk of heart failure in women, according to a study at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. The diet – Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension – showed that women in the top 10 percent of DASH diet scores had half the rate of heart failure of those with the lowest DASH diet scores. The diet is high in potassium, magnesium, calcium and fiber, moderately high in protein, and low in total fat and saturated fat. It is based on high consumption of whole grains, low-fat dairy products, vegetables and fruits. Researcher Emily B. Levitan said that the diet “may contribute to prevention of heart failure in some cases because it effectively reduced blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or "bad") cholesterol levels in clinical trials.”
Robert Preidt , "DASH Diet Has Extra Benefits for Women's Health", HealthDay News, May 11, 2009, © ScoutNews, LLC
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Sodium Content in Restaurant Meals Three Times RDI

May 11, 2009: 04:51 AM EST
The Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) has released a scorecard measuring the sodium content of restaurant meals. The nutrition watchdog group said that more than 80 percent of the 102 meals it analyzed contained more than the recommended daily limit for sodium. Its survey covered 17 full-service and quick-serve chains. The top-scorer was Red Lobster’s Admiral’s Feast, which contained 7,106 milligrams of salt, compared with a recommended daily 2,300mg for healthy Americans and 1,500mg for people with high blood pressure, African-Americans and baby boomers. Meals from Chili's, Olive Garden and Denny's filled the slots from 2 to 7, with KFC, Dairy Queen, and Arby's ranked at Nos. 8, 9, and 10. More than 150,000 premature deaths could be prevented each year if people consumed less sodium, say hypertension experts. CSPI executive director Michael Jacobson acknowledged that it is difficult for restaurants to cut sodium without adversely affecting the taste. He suggested reducing portion sizes, and seeking suppliers of low-sodium ingredients. The organization is pressing the FDA to regulate sodium content in foods, to ensure a “level playing field” for manufacturers and restaurants.
Blair Chancey , "More Bad News for Sodium", qsrmagazine.com, May 11, 2009, © Journalistic Inc.
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Supplements Market Heats Up In India to Meet Consumer Concerns

May 8, 2009: 09:46 AM EST
India is becoming a battleground for vitamins and dietary supplements as more players enter the market and established companies fight for market share. Euromonitor predicts that the market will grow 33 percent by 2013. Key participants are Amway, with 19.9 percent of the market, and Danbur, with 11.8 percent. Heinz India is third overall, followed by Ranbaxy Laboratories and Pfizer, with 4.6 percent each. The market is being driven by urban consumers concerned about stressful lifestyles, pollution and digestive complaints. Swedish cosmetics company Oriflame will launch some of its wellness products in India later this year, and Emami plans to introduce a range of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs for stress relief, diabetes and blood pressure.
Pradipta Mukherjee / Kolkata , "Amway, Dabur to sweat it out over vitamins, dietary supplements", Business Standard, May 08, 2009, © business-standard.com
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American Academy of Environmental Medicine Warns Against GMO Foods

May 8, 2009: 05:14 AM EST
In a review of studies, The American Academy of Environmental Medicine (AAEM) finds a range of concerns and warns against the possible dangers of using genetically modified organisms (GMOs). For example, lab studies conducted on animals show a very high mortality rate for those fed with GM soy and GM cottonseed compared to the control subjects fed with natural foods. AAEM finds that “…it is biologically plausible for Genetically Modified Foods to cause adverse health effects in humans” and is advising physicians to educate their patients about possible risks. AAEM is also calling for, amongst other things, a moratorium on GM foods.
"Genetically Modified Foods", American Academy of Environmental Medicine Website, May 08, 2009, © American Academy of Environmental Medicine
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Probiotics Help New Mothers Regain Normal Weight

May 7, 2009: 10:07 AM EST
As little as one probiotic yogurt a day could help new mothers regain their normal body weight, Finnish researchers say. The University of Turku researchers said that “friendly bacteria” make it harder for the body to digest some foods and cut down on the amount of fat the body stores. Researcher Dr Kirsi Laitinen said that one year after childbirth women taking probiotics “had the lowest levels of central obesity, as well as the lowest body fat percentage” among the 256 women they tracked. The researchers are now studying to see if the children born while their mothers were taking probiotics have also benefited.
Jenny Hope, "Probiotic yoghurt can help mothers shift their post baby fat", Dailymail.co.uk, May 07, 2009, © Associated Newspapers Ltd
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High Fiber, Low Cal Breakfast Keeps Calorie Consumption Down

May 7, 2009: 10:02 AM EST
People eating a high fiber, low calorie breakfast consume fewer calories over breakfast and lunch combined than people who eat a low fiber breakfast cereal, says G. Harvey Anderson, PhD, Professor, Nutritional Sciences and Physiology, University of Toronto. The difference was mostly in the lower calorie breakfast, as all study participants consumed about the same number of calories at lunch. Researchers used General Mills’s Fiber One® cereal as the high fiber component of the breakfast. Previous research shows that Americans eat only half the recommended amount of fiber.
"New Study Reveals a High-Fiber Breakfast Keeps Hunger and Calories in Check", PR-inside.com, May 07, 2009, via Business Wire, © www.earthtimes.org, The Earth Times
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US Organic Product Sales Reach $25 Billion

May 6, 2009: 07:29 AM EST
US sales of organic products, both food and non-food, were $25 billion in 2008, 17 percent higher than 2007, but the slowest growth rate since 2004, according to the Organic Trade Association. Organic food sales grew 16 percent to $23 billion, while non-food grew by 40 percent to reach $2 billion. Organic food now accounts for 3.5 percent of all food sales in the US. High quality retailer store brand organic products are being sought after by consumers, according to J.D. Power and Associates.
Tanya Irwin, "Study: Organic Products Selling Strong Despite Economy", Marketing Daily, May 06, 2009, © MediaPost Communications.
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Purple Corn Outstrips Blueberries for Antioxidants

May 6, 2009: 10:43 AM EST
Purple corn (Zea mays) may be the next big thing in functional foods. A variety of sweet corn, it is now being categorized as a functional food because of its high anthocyanin and phenolics content. Research in Japan, South Korea and Canada has shown that it is effective at warding off the effects of aging and many diseases, including some forms of cancer, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. It outstrips blueberries for anthocyanin content. The cob and husks also contain high levels of the flavanoids, opening opportunities for supplements manufacturers. Most of the crop currently goes into supplements, and the corn is not yet sold in produce stores in the same way as the more common yellow corn.
Barbara Minton, "Business Opportunity: Demand for Purple Corn May Soon Explode ", Natural News, May 06, 2009, © Natural News Network
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Organics Hold Their Own in Tough Times

May 6, 2009: 07:29 AM EST
Sales of organic products rose 17.1 percent in the 2008 calendar year to reach $24.6 billion, according to a survey commissioned by the Organic Trade Association. Food product sales rose by 15.8 percent, accounting for $22.9 billion of the sales total, while non-food organics rose by 39.4 percent. It was the lowest overall rise since the 14.6 percent growth recorded in 2004. Christine Bushway, executive director of the Greenfield, Mass.-based OTA, said that consumers are managing to economize while continuing to buy organic products, helped by more use of coupons, a wider range of store-branded products, and more major products being positioned for value. An upcoming report by J.D. Power and Associates also suggests that “aggressive marketing of high-quality retailer store brand organic products” is changing consumer attitudes towards organics. The OTA’s findings reinforce an earlier Cone Inc. study in which 44 percent of the people surveyed said economic conditions had not changed their organic buying habits, and 34 percent said they were now more likely to buy environmentally responsible products.
Tanya Irwin, "Study: Organic Products Selling Strong Despite Economy", Marketing Daily, May 06, 2009, © MediaPost Communications.
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Wellness Program Based on Blood Analysis, Tailored Regimes

May 6, 2009: 09:48 AM EST
A new wellness program is attracting criticism as well as compliments. Tagged “Metabolic Balance”, the program creates regimes tailored to individual needs, based on blood analysis, at a cost of about $1.40 per day. The aim is to keep insulin and blood sugar levels as low as possible, says the program’s creator, German nutritionist Wolfgang Funfack. Followers eat three meals a day at five-hour intervals, and no snacking is allowed. Critics say Funfack’s claims cannot be proved, and that good health can be achieved by following a few simple and inexpensive rules.
"Metabolic Balance - new mantra for weight loss", China Daily, May 06, 2009, © China Daily Information Co (CDIC)
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Peanuts Rivals Superstars for Health Benefits

May 6, 2009: 10:04 AM EST
The humble peanut may be a rival for the superstars of the food world, according to researchers from the University of South Florida. The nuts, more correctly a legume, the same as chickpeas and lentils, are high in resveratrol, antioxidants, niacin (vitamin B3) and folate. That puts them in the same fat-busting, cancer-combating and stroke-preventing league as red wine. They’re also on a par with blackberries and strawberries for their antioxidant levels, particularly p-coumaric acid, which may protect against atherosclerosis. Niacin and folate contribute to nervous system health and brain function. As if this isn’t enough, peanuts also contain protein and a range of other minerals and vitamins.
Sadia Latifi, "Peanuts pack a surprisingly nutritional punch", Newsday, May 06, 2009, © Tribune Media Services
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Studies Show Weight Control and Health Benefits of Dried Plums

May 5, 2009: 07:32 AM EST
Dried plums may be a healthy low-fat snack that women can eat without gaining weight, according to research from the Department of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences at San Diego State University. Lead researcher Mark Kern, PhD, said the research showed that dried plums were more effective at curbing appetite than a “similarly sweet, low-fat cookie snack”. The plums made people feel full for longer, and produced less plasma glucose and insulin. The study also compared calorie controlled (100 calorie) servings of dried plums with low-fat cookies, and found that the plums had a number of benefits, including boosting blood lipids, easing bowel movements and improving diet quality. Researchers at Florida State University and Oklahoma State University have shown that dried plums play a positive role in bone health and metabolism, boost immune response, and reduce the level of markers of inflammation. Both studies were presented at the 2009 Experimental Biology meeting in New Orleans, and were supported or sponsored by the California Dried Plum Board.
"A Tasty Snack That Can Help Curb Appetite ", Business Wire, May 05, 2009, © The Sacramento Bee
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Beware the Fine Print on “Healthy” Foods

May 5, 2009: 01:04 PM EST
Eating healthily is simpler than many food manufacturers would have us believe. "Try to buy foods as close to their natural state as possible," says Bonnie Taub-Dix, a nutritionist and spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association. The fine print on food labeling is often hard to find – and it may be misleading, says Melinda Beck. Even products marketed as “all natural” may have added ingredients. “Plumped” chickens, for example, are filled with water, salt and sometimes a seaweed extract. The salt boosts the sodium content from 45-60mg per four-ounce serving to 200-400mg. Some salt substitutes have high amounts of potassium, potentially bad for people on heart and liver medications. Many artificial sweeteners can cause diarrhea in susceptible people and raise blood pressure in diabetics. Even products labeled as containing zero trans fats, calories, fats or carbohydrates may contain up to 49mg per serving, because food regulations allow “rounding down”. “Added fiber” may mean it is in a powdered form, considerably less effective than natural fiber. Yogurt, super water and omega-3 also don’t necessarily pack the punch that manufacturers claim. For example, one three-ounce serving of salmon has as much omega-3 as 45 eight-ounce glasses of milk fortified with 32mg of omega-3.
MELINDA BECK, "The Fine Print: What's Really in a Lot of 'Healthy' Foods", Wall Street Journal, May 05, 2009, © Dow Jones & Company, Inc
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Study Launched on Using Probiotics for Weight Control

May 4, 2009: 07:38 PM EST
Chr Hansen, a global biotechnology company, and the University of Copenhagen have combined to study the use of probiotics to control weight. The aim is to develop a way of triggering the feeling of fullness among slightly overweight and normal weight people. Researchers are studying the effects on the small intestines of pigs, which are similar to those in humans. The World Health Organization has identified overweight and obesity as one of the biggest threats to public health, with 1.6 billion people over the age 15 overweight. Commentators point to the potential for probiotics in managing weight as part of the general shift from dieting to using healthier and functional foods as one component of a broader healthy lifestyle.
"Probiotics May Be Able to Help You Stay Fit", NPI Center, May 04, 2009
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Nu-Tek Finds Way to Cut Sodium in Processed Meats

May 4, 2009: 07:27 PM EST
Nu-Tek says it has developed a low-sodium salt that can cut the sodium content of processed meat by up to 50 percent. Tests at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, showed that the flavor of deli ham slices was not compromised if sodium levels were cut to 25 percent. The company says that its product is at least as good as sodium chloride at holding water and emulsifying fat in ground beef. Sodium helps to preserve meat, and aids juiciness, tenderness and emulsification. Processed meats are a major source of sodium in people’s diets, followed by phosphates and lactates.
Mike Stones, "New meat sodium reduction technology on a plate", Food Production Daily.com, May 04, 2009, © Decision News Media SAS
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Young Children Developing Kidney Stones, says Urologist

May 4, 2009: 10:44 AM EST
Kidney stones are becoming an increasing problem in children, says urologist Gary Faerber, MD, at the University of Michigan Health System. The problem is normally associated with people aged 35 to 60. Faerber attributes the rise to obesity, increasingly sedentary lifestyles, high sodium diets, and not drinking enough water. Stones formed by calcium oxalate are the most common in the US. Fruits and vegetables, particularly strawberries and leafy greens, are high in oxalates. High-sugar drinks and fast foods also contribute to the problem. Stones can form if people don’t drink enough water, concentrating the urine and allowing crystals to form and develop into stones.
Margarita Bauza (Media Contact), "Kidney Stones In Children On The Rise, U-M Expert Says", University of Michigan Health System, May 04, 2009, © Regents of the University of Michigan
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EU Clarifies “Mutual Recognition” in Relation to Supplements

May 1, 2009: 07:30 PM EST
A new European Union regulation should make it easier for the supplements and functional foods sector to sell products throughout Europe, says Lorene Courrege, director of regulatory affairs at European Federation of Associations of Health Product Manufacturers. The regulation more closely defines the long-established “mutual recognition” principle. It shifts the burden of proof to a member state if it wants to refuse entry of a product, rather than require the manufacturer to prove it is safe, provided the product is already being sold legally in other EU member states. There have been three recent hearings over the issue in the EU Court of Justice, the latest involving Spain’s refusal to allow botanicals to be sold there.
Richard Clarke, "New mutual-recognition law is 'good news' for functionals sector", Functional Ingredients Mag, May 01, 2009, © Penton Media, Inc
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The Complex Promise of Pre- and Probiotics

May 1, 2009: 07:50 PM EST
The burgeoning and complex field of pre- and probiotics “may be as important or more important to understanding human health than mapping and understanding the human genome,” says Margaret McFall Ngai, PhD, professor of medical microbiology and immunology at the University of Wisconsin’s School of Medicine. Probiotics are known to be essential to human health, and have been been related to allergies, inflammatory conditions, cardiovascualr problems, and digestive health. They provide essential nutrients as well as ward off pathogens. Prebiotics are essential to foster the growth of the “good bacteria” essential to human health. But finding the right bacteria for the right task is not simple. “Probiotic mechanisms are strain specific, condition specific and dose specific,” says S.K. Dash, PhD, president of probiotic producer UAS Labs, Minneapolis, MN. The same strains grown in different environments can produce different effects, says Khem Shahani, PhD. Their medical use dates back thousands of years, but we're still just scratching the surface of their potential.
Casey Adams, "The Promising Potential of Prebiotics & Probiotics", nutraceuticalsworld.com, May 01, 2009, © Rodman Publishing
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Stevia Juices From Earthly Delights Deliver High Antioxidant Dose

May 2, 2009: 07:48 AM EST
Earthly Delights has launched a Stevia-enriched range, each of which, according to the company, contains a full daily allowance of vitamin C. The juices are also said to contain an antioxidant/oxygen radical absorbance capacity of 5,000 per serving along with half of the sugar of pure pomegranate juice.
"Earthly Delights™ Launches Their Stevia Sweetened Juice Blends Featuring a Full Day's Serving of Antioxidants", PRWEB , May 02, 2009, via PRWEB, © PRWEB
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Older People Not Eating Their Vegetables, say UK Researchers

May 1, 2009: 10:48 AM EST
Older people in the UK are not getting their daily fruit and vegetables, says the Changing Ageing Partnership (CAP). Researchers Dr Katherine Appleton from the School of Psychology at Queen's University Belfast and Dr Jayne Woodside found that 22 percent of respondents to their survey were not aware of government guidelines recommending they eat five servings of fruit and vegetables a day. Some thought that two servings were enough. Older people should eat more fruit and vegetables for psychological as well as physical health, Dr Appleton said. The researchers plan to test ways to increase older people’s awareness of the need to eat a healthy diet.
"Older People Are Not Getting Their Five-a-day", Queen's University Belfast, May 01, 2009, © Queen's University Belfast
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FDA Spurs Recall of Weight-Loss Supplement

May 1, 2009: 08:00 AM EST
A supplement widely used by dieters and body builders has been taken off the market at the request of the FDA. The product, Hydroxycut, has been linked to cases of liver damage, including one death. It is made by a Canadian company and distributed in the US by Iovate Health Sciences, headquartered near Buffalo, N.Y. Health officials aren’t sure which of the ingredients cause the problems, which reportedly include conditions ranging from jaundice to liver failure. One medical journal report, however, has pointed the finger at hydroxycitric acid, derived from a tropical fruit. Dr. Linda Katz of the FDA's food and nutrition division said the FDA has no authority to review supplements before they hit the market. The agency can look at them only after they reach the market, and in the case of Hydroxycut, the cases of liver damage were rare and difficult to track. The death of a teenager in 2007, apparently linked to the product, was not reported to the FDA until March this year. Reporting is voluntary.
Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar , "FDA Takes Diet Supplement Off the Market", Time.com, May 01, 2009, © Time Inc.
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FDA Endorsement Boosts Future of Stevia in US

May 1, 2009: 08:04 AM EST
In December 2008 the FDA opened the door to stevia-based sweeteners in the US when it issued a “letter of no questions” that effectively acknowledged them as safe. The US now joins at least 15 other countries where stevia and stevia-sweetened products can be used. Stevia’s big advantage is that it contains no calories. It is 200-300 times sweeter than sugar, and has a wide range of applications in food and beverages. Stevia is suitable for use by diabetics, and there is some evidence that it does not cause tooth decay. The FDA’s view that stevia has GRAS status is backed by the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), which found in June 2008 that it is safe for use as general purpose sweetener.
"Stevia Sweeteners: Another Low-Calorie Option_05-29-09", Food Insight, May 01, 2009, © IFIC Foundation
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Probiotic Sweetener First Product of New Partnership

May 1, 2009: 08:05 AM EST
A partnership between Heartland Sweeteners LLC and Ganeden Biotech has yielded its first fruit: a probiotic sweetener. Named Nevella, the new sugar substitute can be used in baked goods, tea and coffee. Designed to boost immune and digestive health, its makers also say it has “been shown to provide some protection against certain strains of influenza”. The partnership was made public in March. Ganeden Biotech’s patented probiotic bacteria, GanedenBC30, can survive manufacturing and baking temperatures, so that its health benefits are available in the digestive tract.
"Ingredient in Probiotic Sweetener Boosts Immune System ", Nutrition Horizon, May 01, 2009, © Bio-Medicine
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Innovative Capsule Contains Slow-Release Pre- and Probiotics

May 1, 2009: 07:45 AM EST
Capsugel is marketing a new capsule that effectively delivers both pre- and probiotics. The innovative product contains a capsule suspended within a capsule, ensuring that the probiotics reach the intestinal tract, where they can have the greatest benefit. Known as Pre-Pro Combo, the capsule contains the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus probiotic, suspended in a liquid-based prebiotic formula containing Fructo Oligosaccharide. It also uses Capsugel’s Moisture Defense System to keep the contents moisture free. The capsules are made from plant-based HPMC (hypromellose), and sealed with Capsugel’s proprietary LEMS® sealing process.
"Capsugel Introduces Pre-Pro Combo, a Combination Probiotic Supplement", NPI Center, May 01, 2009, © New Hope Natural Media
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Balanced Diet Reason for Taking Supplements, Survey Shows

May 1, 2009: 08:37 AM EST
Most North Americans who take supplements do so to ensure they have a balanced diet, according to a recent Nielsen survey. Overall, 56 percent of Americans and 36 percent of Canadians say they take vitamin and other dietary supplements, compared with the low of 13 percent in Spain and a high of 66 percent in Thailand and the Philippines. Among the North Americans, 61 percent say they take them to ensure their diet is balanced, and 55 percent are trying to boost their immune systems. Preventing illness was the reason given by 51 percent. Globally, more than 50 percent say they take supplements to boost their immune systems. Reasons given for not taking supplements included “they’re not necessary” (40 percent), they’re too expensive (27 percent) and the diet is already balanced (23 percent). More than 75 percent of North Americans who take supplements do so daily, and 17 percent take them two to six times a week.
Richard Clarke, "Most North Americans use supplements, survey shows", Functional Ingredients Mag, May 01, 2009, © Penton Media, Inc.
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Supplements Face Testing Times Amid Recalls, Lawsuits

May 1, 2009: 05:14 AM EST
Dietary supplements are under scrutiny following several high-profile lawsuits amid the recall of more than 60 weight-loss supplements containing traces of undeclared pharmaceuticals. In an opinion piece, Gerald Weissmann, Editor-in-Chief of the Faseb Journal, argues that the 1994 Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) made it impossible for the FDA to adequately regulate and police dietary supplements, giving manufacturers almost free rein to lace them with potentially dangerous pharmaceuticals. Action can be taken only if someone blows the whistle on adverse side effects. Weissmann cites reports that indicate if dietary supplements were subject to the same rigors as pharmaceuticals, at least 472 adverse events would have been reported in the period between 1999 and 2003, caused by echinacea, ginseng, garlic, ginkgo biloba, St. John’s wort, and peppermint.
Gerald Weissmann, "The Atlanta Falcon and Tono-Bungay: Dietary Supplements as Subprime Drugs", The Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, May 01, 2009, © The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
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Healthy Snacks from Fruit Essentials

May 1, 2009: 04:31 AM EST
Fruit Essentials of Wisconsin has launched a cranberry and an omega-fortified mix as a healthy snack option for families. The products contain only natural fruit juices as sweeteners.
"New Snacks Utilize the Power of Cranberries to Promote Better Health for Busy Families ", Food Ingredients First , May 01, 2009
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US Authorities Relaxed over Food Color Concerns

May 1, 2009: 09:41 AM EST
America appears to be less concerned about the possible harmful effects of some food colorings than Europe. A 2007 study at the UK’s University of Southampton concluded that some colorings adversely affect the behavior of children under 13 or 14 years of age. In response, European legislators passed measures requiring warning labels to be used for some colorings, and banned others altogether, including Blue 1 and Green 3. Despite this, Europe’s Food Safety Authority decided not to alter recommended daily intakes of the colorings. America’s FDA also saw no reason to change its policies. Attempts by Maryland Sen. Norman Stone Jr. to require food manufacturers to add warning labels to food, and to ban the use of some colors in foods prepared for the State’s schools, have been killed by legislators. Restaurant chains opposed the measures, while the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) is calling on the FDA to review the issue. CSPI executive vice president Michael Jacobson says it is only a matter of time before consumer pressure forces states and other jurisdictions to consider banning some food colors.
John Gregorson, "Dye Another Day", QSR Magazine, May 01, 2009, © Journalistic Inc
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Popular Fungus Gets Vitamin A Boost from USDA

May 1, 2009: 06:25 AM EST
A USDA research scientist has successfully developed a new strain of a popular fungus that provides higher amounts of vitamin A, offering hopes of combating blindness in children and other conditions in areas of Africa and Southeast Asia. The “red rice yeast” from the Monascus purpureus fungus is popular in rice and other Asian foods. ARS plant geneticist Daniel Z. Skinner has exploited its pigment-producing capability by injecting it with genes from another fungus, Blakelslea trispora, to produce beta-carotene, which the human body readily converts to vitamin A. In the right conditions the fungus can produce as much beta-carotene as a carrot, says Skinner. The work was funded by the USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service.
Jan Suszkiw, "Edible Fungus Could Help Address Vitamin A Deficiency ", May 01, 2009, via USDA
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Plums Join Ranks of Super Fruits as Texas Study Shows Cancer Benefits

April 29, 2009: 07:36 AM EST
Plums are the latest fruit to be branded “super food”. Research at Texas A&M University shows that one plum has at least as many antioxidants and phytonutrients as a handful of blueberries. Plums are also high in carbohydrates, low in fat and low in calories, and contain a range of vitamins and minerals. Of particular interest are the high levels of two phytonutrients, chlorogenic and neochlorogenic acid, which have been shown to slow the release of sugar into the blood. Phytonutrients are known to have anti-cancer properties and to help ward off heart disease and other chronic diseases. The Texas researchers showed that plum phytonutrients stopped the growth of breast cancer cells in laboratory conditions. In the current economic climate plums have another advantage: they are cheap and plentiful. There are also now a number of interesting varieties on the market, some crossed with apricots to produce pluots.
Carol Bareuther , "Ancient plums (and prunes) ‘discovered’ as the newest superfood", The Triton - Megayacht News, April 29, 2009
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A Pill Being Developed to Improve Memory Power

April 29, 2009: 07:05 AM EST
Fatty foods help establish and strengthen long-term memory, according to California researchers, who are developing a pill to cause the same effect. Studies on rats improved memory retention in two areas, and the researchers say the pill works by activating memory-enhancing signals in amygdala, the part of the brain involved in the consolidation of memories of the emotional events. Acids from fats are transformed into oleoylethanolamide (OEA) in the upper region of the small intestine. This sends messages that transform shorter-term impressions into longer lasting memories. The pill is expected to be of particular help for those with brain disorders including Alzheimer's.
"Soon, a pill that won’t let you forget", economictimes.indiatimes.com, April 29, 2009, © Bennett Coleman
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Whole Harvest Claims to Have 100% Natural Trans Fat Free Oil

April 29, 2009: 07:00 AM EST
Food companies and their scientists have been beavering away for years, and spending millions of dollars, trying to make a stable, trans fat free cooking oil without using chemicals or genetically modified soybean oils, and have come up with a number of options. Meanwhile, since 2003, Whole Harvest has been producing an all-natural 100 percent trans fat free soy oil, using a process for which it now has eight US production and product patents. The oil is not hydrogenated, retains its omega-3 and vitamin E content, and its purity has been independently verified.
"Naturally-Produced Zero Trans Oil is Here ", Food Ingredients First , April 29, 2009, © CNS Media BV
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Food Wrapper Chemicals Found in Humans for First Time

April 29, 2009: 10:56 AM EST
Perfluorochemicals used in food wrappers have been found in human blood for the first time, although in small quantities. Researchers at Toronto University say more research is needed to determine how they got there and the sources. The chemicals are used to make food packaging greaseproof and have been the subject of controversy over their effects on human organs, particularly the liver. FDA studies indicate they can migrate into some foods at levels up to several hundred times higher than current FDA-approved guidelines.
Rebecca Renner, "First commercial perfluorochemicals found in human blood", American Chemical Society, April 29, 2009, © American Chemical Society
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Lyc-O-Mato Gets EC Ingredient Approval

April 29, 2009: 06:52 AM EST
The European Commission has cleared LycoRed's natural lycopene complex for sale as a novel food ingredient, according to the company. Lyc-O-Mato can be used in food supplements (15 mg/d) and a wide range of drinks and foods.
"Lyc-O-Mato® Gains EU Approval", foodproductdesign.com, April 29, 2009, © Virgo Publishing
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Dairy Foods Better than Calcium Supplements for Growing Bones

April 29, 2009: 08:28 AM EST
Dairy products are better than calcium carbonate supplements for developing strong bones, says Purdue University professor Connie Weaver. A study funded by the National Dairy Council found that rats fed nonfat dry milk had up to 8 percent better bone growth than rats fed calcium carbonate. The effects continued into the rats’ “teenage” years, suggesting that it would be better for human teenagers to continue to drink milk rather than take supplements or use calcium-fortified foods. The milk appears to stop the bones from losing calcium, rather than actually improve calcium absorption.
CM Weaver, E. Janle, B. Martin, S. Browne, , "Dairy Better For Bones Than Calcium Carbonate, Study Finds", ScienceDaily , April 29, 2009, © American Society for Bone and Mineral Research
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Authenticity, Intensity Are Keys To Great Flavor, Gelato Researcher Concludes

April 27, 2009: 02:21 PM EST
An American graduate student who taste-tested as many as nine gelato – Italy’s version of ice cream – flavors a day concluded that the main differences between Italian and U.S. product are the intensity, authenticity, and freshness of the gelato's flavor. It didn’t matter whether she was sampling common gelati or exotic ones, like bitter orange or chocolate with crushed pepper. American ice creams, she reported in a master’s thesis, taste more of dairy and sugar, and some use artificial flavorings. The student said the findings may help food and ingredients manufacturers looking for intense, authentic flavors for other types of foods.
Kelly R. Thompson, et al., "Sensory Characteristics Of Ice Cream Produced In The U.S.A. And Italy", Journal of Sensory Studies, April 27, 2009, © Wiley Periodicals
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Hospitals Catch On to Healthy Food Trend

April 27, 2009: 04:58 AM EST
Patient demand is spurring hospitals to embrace the trend to organic and natural foods. Some are starting small, such as eliminating trans fats from their menus, while others are growing their own vegetables in a hospital garden. Hospitals are also increasingly realizing that they can be models for good dietary habits, said Jamie Harvie, food coordinator for the Arlington, Va.-based advocacy group Health Care Without Harm. Almost 250 US hospitals have signed a Health Care Without Harm pledge to serve more fresh fruits and vegetables, drop processed foods and trans fats, and use hormone-free milk and organic produce. That’s only a handful of the 7,500 hospitals across the US, but many more are beginning to show interest in the trend, said Joyce Hagen-Flint, director of food and nutrition services at Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point in Hudson, Fla. Some see cost as a barrier, and others note that many patients are on severely restricted diets, limiting the options available.
Elena Conis , "Hospitals adding fresh, organic food to the menu", LA Times, April 27, 2009, © Los Angeles Time
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Biscuit Maker Spends Millions to Slash Saturated Fats

April 27, 2009: 04:03 AM EST
UK-based snack and biscuit maker United Biscuits (UB) says it has cut the saturated fat content in three of its McVitie’s brands by 50 percent, and replaced them with unsaturated fats. The project took three years, and cost $8.7 billion, said Alice Cadmen, head of strategic projects at United Biscuits. Cadmen would not disclose the exact ingredients. The UK’s Food Standards Agency is running an awareness campaign aimed at getting people to reduce the level of saturated fats in their diets, and has been working with the food industry to achieve this. UB is also working to cut saturated fats from its snack lines.
Lindsey Partos, "United Biscuits invests over €6m in NPD for saturated fat reduction", FoodNavigator, April 27, 2009, © Decision News Media SAS
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Teens Cut Back on Luxuries in Recession

April 27, 2009: 05:37 AM EST
US teenagers are cutting back on personal items in the recession, spending about 14 percent less this year compared with 2008. One study, by investment bank Piper Jaffray, found there has been a 12 percent slump in beauty expenditure and a 20 percent fall in eating out; Starbucks is still the favorite location, although Chipotle and McDonalds are increasing market share. Another study by Euro RSCG Discovery found high levels of concern about the economy, with 92% of females and 87% of males aged 13 to 21 indicating they are at least somewhat worried about it. Teen spending accounts for some $125 billion each year and this pull-back, is in contrast to previous downturns when teen spending as more resilient.
Natalie Zmuda, "Teens, Too, Are Tightening Budgets", AdAge.com, April 27, 2009
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Cargill Announces Flavor Solutions That Work With Rebiana

April 27, 2009: 04:53 AM EST
Using its patented technology Cargill has developed flavor solutions for rebiana, its zero-calorie sweetener containing mainly the steviol glycoside rebaudioside A (Reb-A), which is extracted from stevia. Rebiana is the first natural zero-calorie sweetener and is more than 200 times sweeter than sugar. Cargill’s advance on flavors is significant since flavors used in traditional sweetener-based systems often do not work with rebiana. The company claims the new flavor solutions will be well suited for cereal, yogurt, ice cream, confectionery and various beverage applications including carbonated soft drinks and flavored water.
"Cargill Expands its Flavor Offerings to the "Next Generation" of Taste Innovation ", Cargill, April 27, 2009
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GM Maize Provides Three Essential Vitamins

April 27, 2009: 11:32 AM EST
Dr. Paul Christou from Spain's University of Lleida has developed a genetically modified maize that contains three essential vitamins – beta carotene and the precursors of vitamin C and folic acid. It is the first time that a plant has been genetically modified to produce more than one vitamin. The changes carried through for two or three generations of the plant, the research scientists said. Field trials are planned for the US in 2010. The corn could improve the diet of people in poorer nations, according to the researchers. 100-200g of the fortified corn would provide almost all the recommended daily intake of vitamin A and folic acid, and 20 percent of the ascorbate. However, Clare Oxborrow, from Friends of the Earth, said that high-tech fixes seldom worked, and that it would be better to encourage people to grow leafy green vegetables.
Mark Ward , "Engineered maize's vitamin boost ", Science and Technology, BBC News , April 27, 2009, © BBC
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KFC Continues Shifts to “Better for You” Grilled Chicken

April 27, 2009: 04:15 AM EST
KFC is continuing its shift to focus on its new grilled chicken offering, while at the same time keeping the traditional “secret” recipe on the menu. It is also maintaining the “secret” atmosphere: no one is allowed to see the in-restaurant grill. The move is part of a plan to capture the “better for you” market – people looking for healthier food options – without compromising the “fast food” drawcard. The grilled chicken sells at the same price as the traditional Kentucky fried. Charles Sharp, assistant business professor and consumer behavior expert at the University of Louisville, says consumers are changing. They’re becoming more concerned about healthy eating, but want to hang on to the quick service. Trudy Waterstadt, district manager of the Ocala KFC, said that customers have been making positive comments about the grilled chicken, but that some regulars don’t intend to change.
Joe VanHoose, "Residents find healthier option at KFC", Ocala.com, April 27, 2009, © Ocala.com
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Seaweed-Based Pill “Trains” People to Eat Less

April 26, 2009: 05:47 AM EST
A seaweed-based diet pill has been launched in the UK. Appesat expands in the stomach, triggering sensors in the stomach wall that tell people they are full. The effect lasts about four hours before the product is fully digested. The pill’s maker, Goldfield, says that this trains people to want less food, particularly if used in association with a low calorie diet. In one clinical trial, obese and overweight people lost an average of 9.4k over 12 weeks, compared with 5.6kg for a group of people not taking the drug. Both groups were on a low-calorie, low-fat diet. Appesat's worst side effect is a feeling similar to having an upset stomach. It costs $44.00 for 50 capsules.
"New diet pill to fight hunger pangs", The Press Association, April 26, 2009, © The Press Association
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Dairy Products Remain Popular to Deliver Health Benefits

April 24, 2009: 07:38 AM EST
Dairy products have a strong future as people become increasingly aware of their health-promoting properties, and innovation enables them to be fortified with even more nutrients. Milk, yogurt and cheese can now be modified to target a range of health conditions, including digestive complaints, immunity, bone health issues and weight management. They are particularly suited as a delivery system for pre and probiotics, added vitamin D and calcium, and omega-3 fatty acids. AC Nielsen says that there was a 140 percent rise in dairy-related probiotic food and beverage product claims from 2006 to 2007. Mintel said in a 2008 report (“Yogurt and Yogurt Drinks—US”), that sales of yogurt and yogurt drinks for specific medical needs rose 169 percent from 2005 to 2008. Products claiming to boost immunity and digestive health, and lower cholesterol and blood pressure, accounted for 11% of the total market share, up 10% since 2005.
Joanna Cosgrove, "Beyond calcium, dairy products offer a treasure trove of nutritional benefits", nutraceuticalsworld.com, April 24, 2009, © Nutraceuticals World
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Fortified Beverages Can Boost Children’s Omega-3 Intake

April 24, 2009: 03:41 AM EST
Children aged 4 to 12 years could get their daily dose of omgea-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from fortified juices, says Keli M. Hawthorne of Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, lead researcher of a new study funded by Coca-Cola Company. The study showed that children drinking the beverage had higher levels of DHA in their blood after six weeks on the trial. However, it is not clear from the study if there is any resulting health benefit. Hawthorne said “most children” do not get enough omega-3 in their diet, because they “shun fish”. Despite the fact that no health benefits could be shown, Hawthorne suggested that parents concerned that their children may not be getting enough omega-3 could try fortified juices or other food products containing the fatty acid. Coca-Cola provided the beverage used in the trial.
Amy Norton , "Fortified juice boosts kids' omega-3 levels", Reuters, April 24, 2009, © Thomson Reuters
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Tate & Lyle Expands into Green Tea Ingredients

April 23, 2009: 06:37 AM EST
UK ingredients giant Tate & Lyle has gained an exclusive right to market A. Holliday’s high-concentrate green tea extract in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. A. Holliday, a Canadian tea and coffee specialist, produces Teawell 95, a 95 percent concentrate of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the most bioactive component of green tea. EGCG is reputed to increase metabolism, maintain blood glucose levels, and benefit the heart. Tate & Lyle, known for its sugars and starches, has been expanding into a range of healthier options through partnerships with other companies, such as Lipid Nutrition. It has produced a range of prototype products containing Teawell 95, incorporating its sweeteners, and expects the first product to be on the market next year. Coca-Cola is in the firing line in some States of the US over its claim that its EGCG-based beverage, Enviga, can burn calories.
"Tate & Lyle agree exclusive distribution rights for new green tea extract, TEAWELL 95, in Europe, Middle East and Africa ", Tate & Lyle, April 23, 2009, © Tate & Lyle
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Up-Market Restaurants Spur Revival of Macrobiotics in LA

April 22, 2009: 12:39 PM EST
The macrobiotic diet is making a comeback, spurred on by its embracing of several key “healthy eating” trends, including whole grains, eating locally and seasonally, and avoiding or minimizing meat, dairy, and refined sugar. Restaurateurs who are making over the traditional and somewhat stodgy macrobiotic fare of a plate of cooked whole grains with a minimalist topping of vegetables and beans are spurring the revival. Several new macrobiotic themed restaurants have opened recently in Los Angeles, spearheaded by movie star Gwyneth Paltrow’s private chef, Lee Gross.
Betty Hallock , "L.A.'s new macrobiotic scene", Los Angeles Times, April 22, 2009, © Los Angeles Times
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Carotenoids Cut Risk of Developing Metabolic Syndrome

April 23, 2009: 06:26 AM EST
High intakes of antioxidant carotenoids cut the risk of developing Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) in middle-aged and elderly men, says Dutch researcher Ivonne Sluijs from the University Medical Center Utrecht. Her work showed that “Higher total carotenoid, beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, and lycopene intakes were associated with lower waist circumferences and visceral and subcutaneous fat mass”, she said. Men with the highest intake of all carotenoids had a 58 percent lower rate of MetS, while those with the highest intake of lycopene had a 45 percent lower rate. MetS has been linked to increased risks of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Its main symptoms are central obesity, hypertension, and disturbed glucose and insulin metabolism. The research paper has been published in the Journal of Nutrition.
Stephen Daniells, "Carotenoids may halve metabolic syndrome risk", Nutra Ingredient, April 23, 2009, © Decision News Media SAS
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Whole Grains Council Less than Half Way to Target

April 22, 2009: 07:59 AM EST
The Whole Grains Council says that “a typical supermarket” has not yet met its “target” that half the grain products on the market should be whole grain. Revealing the results of a brief snapshot survey of the proportion of whole grains in grain products in a unit of Hannaford Bros. in Dover, N.H., it says that only cereals met or surpassed the Council’s goal. Just over 80 percent of hot cereals and 68 percent of cold cereals made the grade. Only 20 percent and 6 percent of the crackers and cookies respectively were whole grain. Overall, whole grain foods made up 34.7 percent of grain food products. The Council also has a goal of getting consumer to “make [at least] half their grains whole”.
"Half of Grains Not Yet Whole in Typical Supermarket", supermarketnews.com , April 22, 2009, © Penton Media, Inc
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Pulses May Help Reverse Peripheral Arterial Disease

April 21, 2009: 08:50 AM EST
Pulses – a group that includes beans, peas, lentils and chickpeas – may be good for your pulse, according to new research from the Canadian Centre for Agri-Food Research in Health and Medicine (CCARM). The Center’s new clinical study shows that eating pulses can benefit people with peripheral arterial disease (PAD), possibly even reversing the condition. PAD is a form of atherosclerosis, a disease that causes narrowing and hardening of blood vessels in the legs. Eating half a cup of pulses a day for eight weeks resulted in increased blood flow and decreased arterial stiffness, the study showed. The study also showed that pulses contributed to reduced body mass index, reduced total and LDL cholesterol levels, and boosted intake of fiber, folate, Vitamin C, iron, zinc, potassium and protein.
"New Study Shows Eating Pulses Every Day Improves Blood Vessel Function and Fights Heart Disease ", Nutrition Horizon, April 21, 2009
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