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<<68697071727374757677>> Total results:3806 References Per Page:

Inactivity Not Driving Obesity Epidemic

January 8, 2009: 04:49 PM EST
Physical activity may not be a major player in maintaining healthy weight, suggest the authors of a study comparing women from Chicago and Nigeria. Researchers from Loyola University Health System and other centers compared the two groups, and found that they burned about the same amount of energy through physical activity – 760 calories a day in Chicago, and 800 a day in Nigeria. The Chicago women averaged 184 pounds in weight, and the Nigerian 127. "Decreased physical activity may not be the primary driver of the obesity epidemic," said Loyola nutritionist Amy Luke, Ph.D, one of the study authors. Colleague Richard Cooper, Ph.D., chairman of the Department of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, notes that people burn more calories when they exercise, but they compensate by eating more. Diet was the most likely factor in the weight difference, the researchers found. The Nigerian women consumed more fiber and carbohydrates, and less fat and animal protein than the Chicago group, whose diet was 40 percent to 45 percent fat and high in processed foods.
"Researchers: Physical Activity May Not Be a Key Factor to Obesity Epidemic", Nutrition Horizon , January 08, 2009, © CNS Media BV
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Slow Eating Benefits Young Adults

January 6, 2009: 04:53 PM EST
“Slow down and eat” appears to be the key message to take away from a recent study of young adults. The research on 18-25 year olds shows that eating alone or on the run may result in less healthy food choices. Investigators from the School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, found that eating with friends and family was associated with eating more healthful foods, and with higher intakes of calcium and fiber among males. “Eating on the run" was linked to higher consumption of soft drinks, fast food and fat, and with lower intake of several healthful foods among females.
"Young Adults Need to Make More Time for Healthy Meals", January 06, 2009, © Elsevier Health Sciences
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Unilever Seeks Divorce over Hoodia

November 14, 2008: 07:27 PM EST
Unilever is discussing terminating a development agreement with Phytopharm to create a drink-based format using hoodia extract. The company is not satisfied with the results of clinical studies. The two companies signed a license and joint development agreement in December 2004. Unilever says the product is not suitable for its portfolio, while Phytopharm believes that pre-clinical and clinical data justify further work in the areas of obesity, and pharmaceutical and veterinary applications. Hoodia extract has been shown to reduce caloric intake in overweight subjects. Phytopharm says it will seek other partners.
"Phytopharm in Talks with Unilever to End Hoodia Extract Pact,", November 14, 2008, © CNS Media
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UK Govt Launches Obesity Campaign

November 11, 2008: 07:47 PM EST
More than 12,000 grassroots organizations, including the British Heart Foundation and the Fitness Industry Association, have signed up to the UK government’s $413 million anti-obesity Change4Life initiative. Companies including Kellogg's, ITV, Asda, Tesco and PepsiCo have also signed up. The drive to tackle obesity includes price cuts on healthy food from Tesco and Adsa, a national health campaign on ITV, and Pepsi stars featuring in fitness advertisements. The government is also in talks with companies including BSkyB, Kraft and Unilever about joining the initiative, working through the Advertising Association. Health secretary Alan Johnson says the aim is to “create a lifestyle revolution that will help families to eat well, move more and live longer”.
Mark Sweney, "Government Unveils Details of £275m Anti-Obesity Push", November 11, 2008, © Guardian News and Media Limited 2008
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Optiva Gets Heart Health Tick

November 10, 2008: 07:29 PM EST
Kellogg has gained the endorsement of UK cholesterol charity Heart UK for its Optiva cereal brand. It plans to spend $1.71 million on a UK marketing campaign to gain a larger share of the market, and has introduced a new variety, containing oat flakes, hazelnuts and almonds. Kellogg has invested $30 million in the brand since it was launched in August 2006. Optiva is available in Sainsbury's and Morrisons in the UK, and is targeted at the aging population increasingly concerned about cholesterol and heart health.
"UK: Kellogg, Heart Charity in Optivita Push", November 10, 2008, © just-food.com
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Halt Called to Vitamin E and Selenium Supplements Trial, Possible Risk

October 28, 2008: 05:47 PM EST
Vitamin E and selenium do not prevent prostate cancer and may in fact pose a risk to users, forcing the government to stop part of a major study. The SELECT trial involved more than 35,000 men age 50 and older taking one or both supplements or dummy pills. Early data show that slightly more people taking vitamin E alone were getting prostate cancer, and slightly more users of selenium on its own were getting diabetes. The National Cancer Institute says that the link could be coincidental and that there’s no proof there is a risk from the supplements. Previous smaller studies have suggested the two supplements could be beneficial. The men’s health will be tracked for a further three years.
"Study: Supplements Useless for Prostate Cancer", MSNBC, October 28, 2008, © The Associated Press
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